Our Law School's Impact

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Diversifying the legal profession

  • One of the most diverse law schools in the nation
  • 2021 Incoming Class:
    • 35% Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC)
    • 30% First Generation College Students
    • 21% LGBTQ+
  • The Gregoire Fellows Program provides scholarships, stipends, mentoring support, and clerkships for two students each year to help support diversity in the legal profession.

See Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for more information.

Making a legal education more accessible

  • Our acclaimed Access Admission Program provides a pathway to law school and legal careers for students from historically disadvantaged and underrepresented communities.
  • Full Circle Scholarship — one of first of its kind in the nation – helps formerly incarcerated students become lawyers.
  • Flex JD, our new hybrid-online part-time JD program, makes it possible for students with work and family commitments to earn a law degree and enter the legal profession.

Raising the bar for legal education

2023 U.S. News & World Report Rankings

  • #6 Legal Writing Program
  • Top 30 Clinical Training Program
  • Top 35 Part-time JD Program

Our Faculty's Impact

Under the direction of faculty directors, Seattle U Law’s centers explore critical legal issues in society and the economy.

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Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality

Professor Robert Chang leads the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, dedicated to advancing justice and equality and combatting discrimination. See Korematsu Center Turns 10 (PDF) in Lawyer Magazine, Fall 2019

Homeless Rights Advocacy Project

Professor Sara Rankin and her students advance the rights of homeless individuals through the Homeless Rights Advocacy Project. See Poverty Warriors (PDF) in Lawyer Magazine, Fall 2018

The Adolf A. Berle, Jr. Center on Corporations, Law & Society

Professor Charles R.T. O’Kelley’s Berle Center facilitates the study of corporations and the economic system. See Berle Center Marks 10 Years (PDF) in Lawyer Magazine, Spring 2020

Powerful scholarship to explain unprecedented times

The scholarship of Seattle University School of Law’s accomplished faculty goes to the heart of fundamental legal questions on important social justice issues of our day. Below are samples of their incisive analysis:

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Labor unions and the First Amendment

Labor unions make American democracy stronger and more representative, yet the Supreme Court has treated unions’ political advocacy in cases involving union agency fees with suspicion and disdain. The time will soon come when scholars and advocates can realistically begin rebuilding a First Amendment that recognizes labor unions as democracy-enhancing.

Charlotte Garden, Co-Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Professor of Law
Unions and the Democratic First Amendment, in The Cambridge Handbook of Labor and Democracy (Angela B. Cornell & Mark Barenberg eds., forthcoming 2022).

The power of technology companies

There is no topic in regulatory policy that is more pressing and more controversial than what to do about the tech giants — Google, Facebook, Amazon, and Apple. The tech giants should not be broken up. Congress should instead amend the Sherman Act to prohibit exclusionary conduct that significantly reduces competition. This careful expansion would make it much easier to deter tech giant exclusion that harms consumers or workers.

John Kirkwood, Professor of Law
Tech Giant Exclusion, Fla. L. Rev. (forthcoming 2022).

Mutual aid during crises

Around the globe, people are faced with a spiraling succession of crises. As governments fail to respond to each crisis, ordinary people are finding bold and innovative ways to share resources and support the vulnerable. Mutual aid — which is survival work when performed alongside social movement demands for transformative change — is a crucial part of powerful movements for social justice, and offers concrete tools for organizing.

Dean Spade, Professor of Law
Mutual Aid: Building Solidarity During This Crisis (And The Next) (Verso Press 2020).

Our Alumni's Impact

Numbering 11,000+ strong, our alumni fill crucial roles as attorneys, prosecutors, public defenders, judges, entrepreneurs, and many others in the Puget Sound region and around the globe.

Our alumni are using their legal education to bring positive change to our communities. Learn more about our accomplished alumni.

Alumni in Washington State

170

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Attorneys in Attorney General's Office

281

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County Prosecutors

452

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Law firm partners / members*

229

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Members of the judiciary^

102

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County Public Defenders

*Excludes solo practitioners/managing partners, ^Past and present

Our Students’ Impact

  • Last year, our law students pledged 4,586 pro bono hours to help low-income and underserved individuals with free legal assistance.
  • Students in the Immigration Clinic — part of our Top 30 ranked Clinical Training Program — secured asylum for a Cuban immigrant (Lawyer Magazine, Fall 2019, p. 13)
  • During the pandemic, our students helped victims of domestic violence complete legal forms to obtain protective orders from their abusers. Learn more >

Where our Class of 2020 graduates are using their legal education:

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55%

Law Firm

(solo to 501+ attorneys)

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13%

Government

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12%

Business and Industry

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12%

Judicial Clerkships

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7%

Public Interest

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