19th Amendment Centennial Symposium & Annual District Meeting of the Western District of Washington

April 03, 2020 | 4.25 Other CLE Credits

The 19th Amendment of the United States Constitution was ratified one hundred years ago. Voting rights, access to voting, and equality remain critical issues in this country. Come and be part of the 19th Amendment Centennial Symposium as we reflect on the 19th Amendment and the challenges we still confront today. Topics include the Washington Supreme Court’s Gender and Justice Commission and a discussion of modern voting issues and challenges. Co-sponsored with the Federal Bar Association, this program will also include a session on the State of the Court for the District Court and the Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Washington.

Overview

The 19th Amendment Centennial Symposium & Annual District Meeting of the Western District of Washington is proudly co-sponsored by:
The Federal Bar Association
The Seattle University School of Law
Seattle University Law Review
Washington State Supreme Court's Gender & Justice Commission
Ninth Judicial Circuit Historical Society
Program Faculty include:
Washington Supreme Court Judges, Chief Justice Debra L. Stephens, Justice Steven C. González, and Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud; Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judges, Honorable Morgan Christen and Honorable M. Margaret McKeown; Western District of Washington Judges, Honorable Chief Judge Ricardo S. Martinez and Honorable Marsha J. Pechman; and Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Washington Judge, Honorable Chief Judge Marc L. Barreca

Agenda

19th Amendment Centennial Symposium & Annual District Meeting of the Western District of Washington

10:30-11:00 am: Registration and Coffee Service (Pigott Auditorium, Seattle University)

11:00 - noon:      Current Perspectives on Voting Challenges  

• Shelley CavalieriUniversity of Toledo College of Law
• Mae QuinnUniversity of Florida Levin College of Law
• Nicole Godfrey, University of Denver Sturm College of Law 
• Steve Kolbert, Law Clerk for Hon. Brian R. Martinotti, U.S. District Judge, District Court for the District of New Jersey

Noon - 1 p.m:      Lunch (please bring your own or venture offsite)

1:00 - 4:00 pm:   The 19th Amendment Centennial 

Chief Justice Debra L. Stephens, Washington Supreme Court
• Justice Steven C. González, Washington Supreme Court
• Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud, Washington Supreme Court
• Honorable Morgan Christen, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals
• Honorable M. Margaret McKeown, Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals
• Honorable Marsha J. Pechman, District Court for the Western District of Washington
• La Rond Baker, Special Counsel for Affirmative Litigation and Policy, King County Department of Public Defense

4:00 - 4:30 pm:      The State of the Court

• Honorable Chief Judge Ricardo S. Martinez, District Court for the Western District of Washington
• Honorable Chief Judge Marc L. Barreca, Bankruptcy Court for the Western District of Washington

4:30 - 5:30 pm:        Wine & Cheese Reception

Seattle University School of Law, Sullivan Hall, Second Floor Gallery



Presenters

Program Faculty

Chief Justice Debra L. Stephens was unanimously elected by her colleagues as the 57th Chief Justice of the Washington State Supreme Court in 2019. As Chief Justice, she is the court's chief spokesperson, presides over Supreme Court hearings and conferences, and co-chairs the state's Board for Judicial Administration.
Governor Christine Gregoire appointed Chief Justice Stephens to the Washington State Supreme Court on January 1, 2008. That fall, the people of Washington elected her to serve a six-year term and re-elected her in 2014. Prior to her appointment, Chief Justice Stephens served as a judge for Division Three of the Court of Appeals. She is the first judge from that court to serve on the Washington State Supreme Court, as well as the first woman from Eastern Washington to do so.

Justice Steven C. González was appointed to the Washington State Supreme Court effective January 1, 2012, and subsequently won two contested races for six-year terms starting in 2013 and 2019. Before joining the Supreme Court, Justice González served for ten years as a trial judge on the King County Superior Court hearing criminal, civil, juvenile, and family law cases.
Justice González earned his B.A. with Honors in East Asian Studies from Pitzer College and his J.D. from U.C. Berkeley School of Law where he was the Technical Editor of the La Raza Law Journal. As a part of his undergraduate degree, Justice González studied at Waseda University in Tokyo, Japan and at Nanjing University in China. Before law school, he did graduate work in Economics at Hokkaido University on a scholarship from Rotary International. He received Honorary Doctor of Laws Degrees from Gonzaga University School of Law in 2011 and the University of Puget Sound in 2015. In 2018, he taught State Constitutional Law at Gonzaga University School of Law.

Justice Sheryl Gordon McCloud was first elected to the Washington Supreme Court in November of 2012. As a Justice, she serves as Chair of the Washington State Supreme Court Gender & Justice Commission, as a member of the Supreme Court's Rules Committee, and as the liaison to the Supreme Court's Pattern Instructions Committee (on which she previously served as a lawyer-member). She is also the Supreme Court's representative on the Washington State Bar Association's Council on Public Defense. She speaks regularly at legal and community events throughout the state on topics ranging from ethics to constitutional rights.
In 2015, Washington Women Lawyers King County Chapter honored her with its President's Award; in 2018 as well as awarded the L'Dor V'Dor Award from the Cardoza Society. Her legal expertise was recognized by her peers; they have awarded her the Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers' highest award, the William O. Douglas Award, for "extraordinary courage" in the practice of law. She was also an invited member of the American Association of Appellate Lawyers and was a founding member of the Washington Appellate Lawyers Association, both of which limit membership to the most accomplished appellate lawyers. In addition, she was an adjunct Professor at Seattle University School of Law.

Honorable Chief Judge Ricardo S. Martinez is a United States District Judge for the United States District Court in Seattle, Washington is currently the chair of the Ninth Circuit Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee and is a member of the Federal District Court Judges Association. He serves as the Ninth Circuit representative to the Criminal Law Committee of the U.S. Judicial Conference. Currently serving as a United States District Judge for the Western District of Washington, he was nominated by President George H. Bush on October 12, 2003 and confirmed by the Senate on June 15, 2004.
Prior to that appointment he served as a United States Magistrate Judge for the Western District of Washington from June of 1998 to June of 2004. He served for almost nine years as a Judge of the Superior Court for King County. He was appointed to that position by Governor Booth Gardner on March 23, 1990. Judge Martinez has served as a general trial judge in the Civil, Criminal and Juvenile departments of Superior Court. During his tenure on the Superior Court bench he gained extensive experience in all aspects of case disposition including serving as the trial judge in a death penalty case. He was responsible for the inception of the first Drug Diversion Court in the state of Washington. He served as the Drug Court Judge in King County from 1994 to 1997.

Honorable Chief Judge Marc L. Barreca is a judge on the United States bankruptcy court, Western District of Washington. Prior to joining the court, Barreca was a partner with the firm K&L Gates LLP from 1987 to 2010. He was appointed to the court on July 13, 2010. Barreca received his undergraduate and J.D. degrees from the University of Washington.
Honorable Morgan Christen is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Christen previously served on the Alaska Supreme Court having been appointed on March 4, 2009 by Governor Sarah Palin to replace outgoing justice Warren Matthews. The United States Senate confirmed Christen on December 15, 2011 in a 95-3 vote. She received her commission on January 11, 2012. On May 18, 2011, Obama nominated Christen to the seat on the Ninth Circuit vacated by Andrew Kleinfeld who assumed senior status on June 12, 2010. On September 8, 2011, the Senate Judiciary Committee reported her nomination to the Senate floor by voice vote. The Senate confirmed Christen in a 95-3 vote on December 15, 2011. She received her commission on January 11, 2012. Justice Christen studied at the University of Washington, B.A., 1983 and Golden Gate University School of Law, J.D., 1986.

Honorable Morgan Christen is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. Christen previously served on the Alaska Supreme Court having been appointed on March 4, 2009 by Governor Sarah Palin to replace outgoing justice Warren Matthews. The United States Senate confirmed Christen on December 15, 2011 in a 95-3 vote. She received her commission on January 11, 2012. On May 18, 2011, Obama nominated Christen to the seat on the Ninth Circuit vacated by Andrew Kleinfeld who assumed senior status on June 12, 2010. On September 8, 2011, the Senate Judiciary Committee reported her nomination to the Senate floor by voice vote. The Senate confirmed Christen in a 95-3 vote on December 15, 2011. She received her commission on January 11, 2012. Justice Christen studied at the University of Washington, B.A., 1983 and Golden Gate University School of Law, J.D., 1986.

Honorable Mary Margaret McKeown is a United States Circuit Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and is based in San Diego, California. McKeown has served on the Ninth Circuit since her confirmation in 1998.McKeown was the first female partner with the law firm of Perkins Coie in Seattle, Washington, and Washington, D.C., representing clients like Boeing, Nintendo and Citicorp during her time at the firm, from 1975 until 1998. McKeown also served in the White House as a White House fellow under President Jimmy Carter, working as a special assistant to the United States Secretary of the Interior Cecil D. Andrus from 1980 until 1981. 
She received her Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Wyoming in 1972, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, and her Juris Doctor from Georgetown University Law Center in 1975. She has also received an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from Georgetown and studied at the University of Madrid. Judge McKeown is an adjunct professor at the University of Washington Law School and at the University of San Diego School of Law. She is best known in academia for her work in intellectual property law.

Honorable Marsha J. Pechman is a Senior United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Cornell University in 1973 and a Juris Doctor from Boston University School of Law in 1976. She was a legal intern, King County Prosecutor's Office in 1976. She was a deputy prosecutor, King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office from 1976 to 1979. She was an instructor/staff attorney of University of Washington School of Law from 1979 to 1981. She was in private practice in Seattle from 1981 to 1988. She was an Adjunct professor, University of Puget Sound from 1983 to 1987. She was a judge on the King County Superior Court, Washington, from 1988 to 1999.
On March 24, 1999, Justice Pechman was nominated by President Bill Clinton to a seat on the United States District Court for the Western District of Washington vacated by William L. Dwyer. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 8, 1999 and received her commission on September 9, 1999. On September 1, 2011, she became Chief Judge, succeeding Judge Robert S. Lasnik. She assumed senior status on February 6, 2016. Justice Pechman most notably made headlines when she blocked an order by Attorney General William Barr that would have denied some asylum-seeking migrants the right to a bond hearing, keeping them detained indefinitely until their asylum cases are closed.Brooke Coleman is the Associate Dean of Research & Faculty Development and Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law. Her research and teaching interests focus on procedure and procedural justice. Her work has been published in the New York University Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, Indiana Law Journal, Notre Dame Law Review, and Boston College Law Review, among others. She is also the lead author of an innovative civil procedure casebook, Learning Civil Procedure.

Brooke Coleman is the Associate Dean of Research & Faculty Development and Professor of Law at Seattle University School of Law. Her research and teaching interests focus on procedure and procedural justice. Her work has been published in the New York University Law Review, Northwestern University Law Review, Indiana Law Journal, Notre Dame Law Review, and Boston College Law Review, among others. She is also the lead author of an innovative civil procedure casebook, Learning Civil Procedure

Prior to joining Seattle University, Professor Coleman was a Thomas C. Grey Fellow at Stanford Law School. She also clerked for Honorable David F. Levi, district judge in the Eastern District of California and then-chair of the Standing Committee on the Federal Rules of Practice and Procedure. Before her clerkship, she practiced as an attorney at Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati and Gunderson Dettmer Stough Villeneuve Franklin & Hachigian in Palo Alto, California. Professor Coleman's teaching interests include civil procedure, advanced litigation, and federal courts. She has received numerous honors for her teaching, including the law school's Outstanding Faculty Award in 2013, 2015, and 2016.

La Rond Baker is the special counsel for affirmative litigation and policy, drafts legislation and identifies priority legislation for DPD to support or oppose, litigates appeals as needed strategically, and acts as co-counsel in litigation involving systemic issues that harm DPD's clients. Before joining DPD, she worked in the Civil Rights Unit of the Washington State Attorney General's Office, where she fought issues such as the DOD's ban on open service by transgender individuals and a private detention center's practice of paying detainees $1/day for labor. 

Mae C. Quinn is a leading voice in legal education and law reform. Her scholarly work bears witness to the ways in which law and legal institutions may create and perpetuate marginalization and vulnerability. At the same time, it promotes action and change, offering concrete legal solutions and methods for improvement. Her teaching and litigation have been recognized with numerous honors including the Missouri Lawyers' Legal Champion Award and highlighted by national and international press outlets, including National Public Radio, the Washington Post, the Nation, and Australian public television.

Quinn's juvenile defense and second-chance sentencing initiatives for youthful offenders, undertaken in collaboration with law students, have been used as practice models, contributed to United States Department of Justice reform efforts, and included in training materials produced by the National Juvenile Defender Center. Quinn has also served as an expert witness before the Ferguson Commission, legislative bodies, and in other settings, in addition to training legal professionals across the country at programs like the Darrow-Baldus Criminal Defense College, Ethical Society of Police, National Association of Children's Counsel, and National Institute for Trial Advocacy.

Shelley Cavalieri is a feminist legal scholar whose work focuses on the construction of women's legal agency under the constraints of patriarchy. She has explored these themes in the contexts of the United States and Ecuador, and in the field of human trafficking. More broadly, her scholarship engages questions of the role of law in advancing equality and justice, which she has taken up in the field of property law through her scholarship on land reform and land banking in struggling midwestern cities. 
She has also written on the capabilities approach, which she enlists to consider the role of states in fostering citizens' agency and how citizens strategize to advocate on their own behalf. An expert in property law, Professor Cavalieri is co-author of a property law casebook with Toledo Law Dean D. Benjamin Barros and Anna Hemingway. Cavalieri is a graduate of the University of Virginia (BA in bioethics) and the University of California, Berkeley (JD).

Nicole B. Godfrey is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Civil Rights Clinic (CRC). From 2015-2018, Nicole served as the Clinical Teaching Fellow in the CRC, earning an LL.M. in clinical legal education in May 2018. Nicole received her M.A. in International Human Rights from the University of Denver Josef Korbel School of International Studies, her J.D. from Denver Law, and her B.A. in International Relations from Boston University. After law school, Nicole worked as a staff attorney for Prisoners' Legal Services of New York before returning to Colorado to co-found an organization dedicated to protecting the constitutional rights of prisoners confined in Colorado. 
For this work, Nicole was a co-recipient of the 2013 Progressive Young Leadership Award from the Colorado Lawyer Chapter of the American Constitution Society. Prior to joining the faculty at DU Law, Nicole worked as an associate attorney at the Denver civil rights firm of Killmer, Lane & Newman, LLP (KLN). Her practice at KLN focused on law enforcement misconduct, employment discrimination, and prisoners' rights.

Steve Kolbert (Twitter: @Pronounce_the_T), emerging scholar, focuses his research on elections and voting, drawing in part on his experience as an election administrator in the largest election jurisdiction in the Washington, DC area. A proud "Florida Man," Steve graduated from Florida State University College of Law and has worked for every branch of Florida government, including a clerkship at the Florida Supreme Court, managing inter-chamber parliamentary procedure at the Florida Senate, and serving as a state prosecutor in Central Florida. He currently clerks for the U.S. District Court for the District of New Jersey.

Pricing

General Registration - $150.00

Federal Bar Association Members and Seattle University School of Law Alumni - $110.00

Seattle University School of Law Students and University of Washington School of Law Students - $25.00

In-person atendance only.

Cancellations and Refunds:
The last day to cancel your registration for this program is 4:30 p.m., Friday, March 27, 2020. A $15 administrative fee is charged for cancellations and the balance will be refunded. After 1 week before the program, cancellations will not receive a refund; however, substitute attendees are welcome. Please inform us of substitutions at cle@seattleu.edu or (206) 398-4821.