Protecting the Earth's Ozone Layer and Climate: Is International Law up to the Task? A Dialogue

1.5 Law and Legal CLE Credits | WSBA Activity ID #1065474

This program is the first in a new series of seminars based on dialogue between experts in various legal specialties. Featuring Professor Mark Chinen of Seattle University School of Law in conversation with international law expert Professor Thomas Schoenbaum of University of Washington and Georgetown Schools of Law, these two respected scholars will delve into the impact international law can have on the world's climate, when the U.S. administration is unwilling to act.

Overview

Recorded:  02/16/2018
Credits:  1.5 Law and Legal CLE | WSBA Activity ID #1065474
Length: 90 minutes

Featured Speakers:
Professor Thomas Schoenbaum, Professor Mark Chinen

Professor Thomas Schoenbaum, University of Washington and Georgetown Schools of Law , author of seminal texts on International Environmental, Admiralty, and Maritime Law, engages in conversation with Professor Mark Chinen of Seattle University School of Law. This dialogue-based style of seminar allows speakers and participants to engage in-depth, and exchange ideas and opinions through the give and take of conversation.

Questions and concepts to be addressed include:

  • Why has international law been relatively successful in protecting the ozone layer?
  • To what extent does the protection of the ozone layer serve as a model for responding to climate change? To what extent does it not?
  • How do you respond to critics who argue that even before the change in the U.S. administration, international measures to respond to climate change were too feeble?
  • What are the basic features of the Paris Agreement?
  • What is the likely fate of the Agreement now that there has been a change in administration?
  • Can the other parties to the Agreement move forward effectively without the participation of the United States?
  • What is the procedure for withdrawing from the Agreement?
  • Can the states, such as California, take up the slack on the federal level with regard to climate change? What, if anything, can they do on the international level?
  • In what ways does the international response to climate change reveal the strengths and weaknesses of international law?

Agenda

Agenda is subject to change.

12:00 p.m.

Welcome and Introductions

12:05 p.m.

Dialogue, Part I - International Law and the Ozone Layer

  • Why has international law been relatively successful in protecting the ozone layer?
  • To what extent does the protection of the ozone layer serve as a model for responding to climate change? To what extent does it not?
  • How do you respond to critics who argue that even before the change in the U.S. administration, international measures to respond to climate change were too feeble?

12:35 p.m.

Dialogue, Part II - The Paris Agreement

  • What are the basic features of the Paris Agreement?
  • What is the likely fate of the Agreement now that there has been a change in administration?
  • Can the other parties to the Agreement move forward effectively without the participation of the United States?
  • What is the procedure for withdrawing from the Agreement?

1:00 p.m.

Dialogue, Part III - State and Local Response and International Connections

  • Can the states, such as California, take up the slack on the federal level with regard to climate change? What, if anything, can they do on the international level?
  • In what ways does the international response to climate change reveal the strengths and weaknesses of international law?

1:30 p.m.

Conclusions, Evaluations & Adjournment

Presenters

Thomas J. Schoenbaum

Thomas J. Schoenbaum is presently the Harold S. Shefelman Professor of Law at the University of Washington in Seattle. He received his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Michigan and his PhD degree from Gonville and Caius College, University of Cambridge (UK). He is also Research Professor of Law at George Washington University in Washington DC. He is a practicing lawyer, admitted in several U.S. states and before the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States. He has been a professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and was Associate Dean at Tulane University in New Orleans.

For twenty years he served as Dean Rusk Professor and Executive Director of the Dean Rusk Center at the University of Georgia. He lived in Japan for 10 years, teaching as Professor of Graduate Studies at the International Christian University.

Professor Schoenbaum lectures all over the world and is the author of many books and articles on International Economic Law, Business Law, International Environmental law and Maritime Law.

Mark Chinen

Mark Chinen is a Professor of Law at the Seattle University School of Law and a Fellow of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality. He was educated at Pomona College and Yale Divinity School before receiving his law degree from Harvard Law School. Before he began law teaching, Professor Chinen practiced in the areas of international trade, banking and corporate and securities law in Washington D.C. with the firm, Covington & Burling. Professor Chinen teaches contracts and courses in international law and writes on various aspects of international law, particularly international governance, theology and international law, and the relationship between domestic and international law. He was the inaugural William C. Oltman Professor of Teaching Excellence from 2007 to 2010.

Pricing

General Registration - $39.00

Seattle University School of Law Alumni - $29.00

In-person and live webcast options available