Janet Ainsworth

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Janet AinstworthPlease describe any professional and extra-curricular activities in which you are engaged that are related to social justice. Such activities can encompass a wide range: examples include service on non-profit bodies or on commissions, pro-bono representation, fact-finding, and other professional and extra-curricular activities.

  • Member, Washington State Supreme Court Committee on Pattern Jury Instructions
  • Member, American Bar Association, Juvenile Justice Center investigational research team studying access to counsel and quality of representation in juvenile courts nationally
  • Member, Libel Reform Campaign and co-author of white paper criticizing UK libel law's lack of public interest and scholarly research defenses to libel
  • Member, Royal Commission on Libel Law Reform (UK)
  • UK Economic and Social Research Council's Center for the Study of Civil Society, researcher on civil society, social capital, and increasing civic participation
  • Research Grant Council of Hong Kong, team member working on improving bilingual judicial system in Hong Kong
  • Czech Republic Science Foundation, assisted in developing protocols for self-represented civil litigants who do not speak Czech as a first language
  • Co-drafter of amicus briefs to the US Supreme Court in petitions for certiorari and in docketed cases
  • Member, National Association of Criminal Defense Attorneys Amicus Committee
  • Past Co-chair, Washington State Bar Association Task Force on State Municipal Court Reform
  • Past member, Board Of Governors, Washington Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers
  • Past member, Board of Directors, Seattle-King County Public Defender Association
  • Past member, King County Office of Public Defense Panel for Quality Assessment
  • Past member, Washington State Legislative Committee on Insanity and Diminished Capacity Law Reform
  • Past member, Indigent Defense Advisory Committee of the Washington Department of Community Development

Please describe any scholarly projects in which you have or are engaged that involve social justice.

  • Published scholarship involving issues of social justice:
  • What's Wrong with Pink Pearls and Cornrow Braids?: Employee Dress Codes and the Semiotic Performance of Race and Gender in the Workplace, in Anne Wagner, Sophie Cacciaguidi, and Richard Sherwin, eds., LAW, CULTURE AND VISUAL SEMIOTICS, Springer Publishing (2014).
  • The Vanishing Right to Remain Silent in American Police Interrogation: A Linguistics-Based Critique, in Michael Freeman, ed., CURRENT ISSUES IN THE LAW: LANGUAGE AND LAW, Oxford University Press (2013).
  • The Meaning of Silence in the Right to Remain Silent, in Lawrence Solan and Peter Tiersma, eds., THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF FORENSIC LINGUISTICS 287 (2012).
  • The Performance of Gender as Reflected in American Evidence Rules: Language, Power, and the Legal Construction of Liability, 6 GENDER AND LANGUAGE 181 (2012).
  • Adoptive Admissions and Apologies in the Law of Evidence: A Linguistic Critique, PROCEEDINGS, INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR FORENSIC LINGUISTICS BIENNIAL MEETING 2010 pp. 12-34 (2012)
  • Review, Susan Berk-Seligson, COERCED CONFESSIONS: THE DISCOURSE OF BILINGUAL POLICE INTERROGATIONS, 30 MULTILINGUA 408 (2011)
  • The Construction of Admissions of Fault through American Rules of Evidence: Speech, Silence and Significance in the Legal Creation of Liability, in Anne Wagner and Le Cheng, eds. EXPLORING COURTROOM DISCOURSE: THE LANGUAGE OF POWER AND CONTROL (2011)
  • Language, Power, and Identity in the Workplace: Enforcement of ‘English Only' Rules by Employers, 9 SEATTLE JOURNAL FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE 233 (2010)
  • Linguistic Ideology in the Workplace: The Legal Treatment in American Courts of Employers' ‘English Only' Policies, in Mauricio Gotti and Christopher Williams, eds., LEGAL DISCOURSE ACROSS LANGUAGES AND CULTURES PP. 277-294 (2010)
  • Curtailing Coercion in Police Interrogation: The Failed Promise of Miranda v. Arizona, in Malcolm Coulthard and Alison Johnson, eds., HANDBOOK OF FORENSIC LINGUISTICS, Routledge Press, pp. 111-126 (2010).
  • Linguistic Ideology versus Linguistic Practice: The Cognitive and Cultural Challenges of Code-Switching to "English-Only" Rules in American Workplaces, in Lelija Socanac, Christopher Goddard, and Ludger Kremer, eds. CURRICULUM, MULTICULTURALISM, AND THE LAW, Globus Press (2009).
  • ‘We Have Met the Enemy and He is Us': Cognitive Bias and Perceptions of Threat, in Stephen Garvey et al., eds., CRIMINAL LAW CONVERSATIONS, Oxford University Press (2009)
  • Children and Criminal Procedure, in Richard A. Shweder, Thomas R. Bidell, Anne C. Dailey, Suzanne D. Dixon, Peggy J. Miller, and John Modell, eds. THE CHILD: AN ENCYCLOPEDIC COMPANION, University of Chicago Press (2009).
  • 'You Have the Right to Remain Silent. . . But Only If You Ask for It Just So': The Role of Linguistic Ideology in American Police Interrogation Law, 15 INT'L JOURNAL OF SPEECH, LANGUAGE, AND LAW 1 (2008).
  • Curses, Swearing, and Obscene Language in Police-Citizen Interactions: Why Lawyers and Judges Should Care, in M. Teresa Turell, Maria Spassova, and Jordi Cicres (eds.), PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND EUROPEAN IAFL CONFERENCE ON FORENSIC LINGUISTICS/ LANGUAGE AND THE LAW, 19 Seriè Activitats 315, Institut Universitari de Lingüìstica Aplicada (2007).
  • Linguistic Ignorance or Linguistic Ideology?: Sociolinguistic and Pragmatic Issues in Police Interrogation Rules, 51 TEXAS LINGUISTIC FORUM 28 (2007).
  • Achieving the Promise of Justice for Juveniles: A Call for the Abolition of Juvenile Court, in Anne McGillivray, ed., GOVERNING CHILDHOOD, Dartmouth Press (1997)
  • The Effectiveness of the Court in Protecting the Rights of Juveniles in Delinquency Cases, 6 JOURNAL OF THE FUTURE OF CHILDREN 64 (Winter 1996).
  • Youth Justice in a Unified Court: A Response to Critics of the Proposal to Abolish Juvenile Court, 36 BOSTON COLLEGE LAW REVIEW 927 (1995).
  • Punishment in America, 19 THE CHAMPION 52 (December 1995).
  • In a Different Register: The Pragmatics of Powerlessness in Police Interrogation, 103 YALE LAW JOURNAL 259 (1993); reprinted in in Richard A. Leo and George C. Thomas, eds., THE MIRANDA DEBATE: LAW, JUSTICE, AND CRIME CONTROL (1998); excerpted in Yale Kamisar, Wayne R. LaFave, and Jerold H. Israel, MODERN CRIMINAL PROCEDURE (8th ed. 1994).
  • Speaking of Rights, 37 NEW YORK LAW SCHOOL LAW REVIEW 259 (1992)
  • Re-imagining Childhood and Reconstructing the Legal Order: The Case for Abolishing the Juvenile Court, 69 NORTH CAROLINA LAW REVIEW 1083 (1991); reprinted in in S. Randall Humm, et al., eds., CHILD, PARENT, AND STATE (1994); excerpted in Barry Feld, CASES AND MATERIALS ON JUVENILE JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION (2000); excerpted in Ellen Marrus and Irene Merker Rosenberg, CHILDREN AND JUVENILE JUSTICE (2007)
  • Presentations on issues of social justice:
  • "Code-switching and Code-mixing by Bilingual Workers in the Workplace: Legal Regulation and Linguistic Reality" (University of International Business and Economics, Beijing China, October 2013)
  • "Making Linguistics Relevant to the Law: Training Lawyers to Understand Language Issues" (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), June 2013)
  • Aston University, Distinguished Scholar in Residence lecture, "Anatomy of a False Confession: The Linguistic and Psychological Characteristics of False Confessions and Reforms to Prevent the Conviction of the Innocent;" versions also presented at Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Cardiff University, University of Leeds, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong University, Guangdong University, China University of Political Science and Law, Zhejiang Police University (Sept 2012, April- May 2013)
  • Cardiff University, colloquium analyzing product safety warnings in personal injury litigation (April 2013)
  • Aston University, lecture "Linguistic Features of Police Interrogation: Comparing Practices in the United States and the United Kingdom" (April 2013)
  • "Knowledge, Power, and Identity: The Semiotics of Expertise in American Courtroom Discourse" (Nanjing Normal University, October 2012).
  • West Coast Roundtable on Language and the Law, workshop presentation on the discursive construction of police coercion in consent to search cases (Simon Fraser University,July 2012)
  • International Association of Forensic Linguists Regional Conference, plenary address, ‘Transcending the Particular and Transforming the Normative Order" (University of Malaya, July 2012)
  • "Linguistic Ideology and the Law's Embrace of the Genderless Subject" (Universidade do Vale do Rio dos Sinos, June 2012)
  • "Employee Dress Codes: The Contest over the Meaning of Race and Gender in the Workplace" (Law and Society Association, May 2012)
  • International Conference on Law, Language and Discourse: Multiculturalism, Multimodality, and Multidimensionality, plenary address entitled "Why Do Innocent People Confess to Crimes They Did Not Commit?: A Consideration of the Linguistic and Psychological Characteristics of False Confessions and Forensic Linguistic Suggestions for Reforms to Prevent the Conviction of the Innocent" (Hangzhou China, April 2012)
  • Rethinking To Kill a Mockingbird Fifty Years Later: A Symposium, presentation entitled "Law's Seduction and Betrayal: How Would-Be Lawyers Misunderstand the Lessons of To Kill a Mockingbird (Seattle University, March 2012)
  • "Language and Identity in the Workplace: American Legal Treatment of Bilingual Workers" (Hong Kong Polytechnic University, September 2011)
  • "Code-switching and Code-Mixing in the Workplace: Legal Regulation and Social Reality" (Beijing University for Foreign Studies, August 2011)
  • "A Linguistic Consideration of the Right to Remain Silent in American Criminal Procedural Law" (City University of Hong Kong, August 2011)
  • "Adoptive Admissions and Apologies in the Law of Evidence: A Linguistics Based Critique (U. Birmingham, July 2011)
  • Current Legal Issues: Law and Language Colloquium, paper presented, "Silence, Speech, and the Paradox of the Right to Remain Silent in American Police Interrogation (University of London, Faculty of Laws, July 2011)
  • West Coast Roundtable on Language and Law, workshop project on law, language, and gender (San Diego State University, June 2011)
  • "Is Attorney Misconduct Gendered?: Male Over-representation in Attorney Disciplinary Matters" (American Association of Law Schools Mid Year Meeting June 2011)
  • "The Semiotics of Dress in the Workplace and the Contest over the Performance of Identity" (Law and Society Association, May 2011)
  • "Bilingual Interaction in the Workplace: Culture, Ethnicity, and Civil Rights" (American Culture Association, April 2011)
  • "Cursing and Coercion in Constructing ‘Consent': Abusive Language by Police in Police-Citizen Street Interactions," in panel, "Language Ideologies and the Construction of Consent in the Legal Process" (Southampton University, September 2010)
  • "Why Miranda Doesn't Protect the Right to Remain Silent, Why It Probably Never Could Work, and What Might Work Better to Protect Individuals' Rights," (Brooklyn Law School April 2010).
  • "Police Interrogation and False Confessions: Surprising Linguistic Evidence and Suggestions for Legal Reform" (sponsored by China's National Key Research Center for Linguistics and the China Association for Forensic Linguistics, March 2010)
  • The Rights and Obligations of Non-marital Intimate Partners: Relational Estoppel as a Developing Legal Construct" (University of Nevada-Las Vegas School of Law February 2010)
  • "Linguistic Ideology versus Linguistic Practice: The Cognitive and Cultural Challenge of Code-Switching to English-Only Rules in the American Workplace" (Vrije Universiteit, July 2009)
  • Conference on Translation, Interpreting and Comparative Legi-Linguistics, plenary address entitled, "Linguistic Ideology in the Law in Action: The Law's Construction of Bilingualism" (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan Poland. July 2009)
  • "Linguistic Ideology in the Multi-lingual Workplace: A Comparative Look at EU and US Law" (University of Bergamo, June 2009)
  • "Linguistic Ideology versus Linguistic Practice: The Cognitive and Cultural Challenge of Code-Switching to English-Only Rules in the Workplace" (Law and Society Association, May 2009)
  • "Making the Impossible Possible or Making Impossibility Palatable and How to Know the Difference," commentary on symposium lecture "Asking Jurors to Do the Impossible," (University of Tennessee College of Law, March, 2009)
  • "A Re-visit to the Feminist Re-visit to the Core Curriculum," (University of Pennsylvania School of Law, February 2009)
  • "The Performance of Gender as Reflected in American Evidence Rules: Language, Power, and the Legal Construction of Liability" (Law and Society Association, May 2008).
  • "Ideology of Language in Legal Doctrine and Practice: Ethnographic, Sociolinguistic, and Discourse Analytic Perspectives (University of Colorado, October 2007)
  • "Framing the Architecture of Coercion: Discursive Context in Police-Citizen Street Interactions" (University of Nottingham, September 2007)
  • "Beyond Status and Contract: Relational Estoppel as a Source of Rights and Obligations in Intimate Relationships" (Law and Society Association, July 2007)
  • "Children Encountering Justice: Interrogations, Confessions, and Criminalization" (Law and Society Association, July 2007)
  • International Society of Family Law Conference, "Beyond Status and Contract: Relational Estoppel as a Source of Rights and Obligations in Intimate Relationships" (Vancouver, British Columbia, June 2007)
  • "The Costs of Linguistic Ignorance: Sociolinguistic and Pragmatic Issues in Police Interrogation Rules" (U. Texas, April 2007)
  • Participant, Roundtable on "Cautions and Confessions: Miranda v. Arizona After 40 Years," (U. Colorado October 2006)
  • "Curses, Swearing, and Obscene Language in Police-Suspect Interactions: Why Lawyers and Judges Should Care" (September 2006)
  • Presentation at West Coast Roundtable on Language and the Law on research in gender, language use, and power in the criminal law (August 2006)
  • "The Linguistic Pragmatics of Coercion in Police-Community Interactions-Why It Matters" (Law and Society Association, July 2006)
  • "Gender and Attorney Disciplinary Violations: What We Know, What We Don't Know, and What We Need to Find Out," (Loyola Los Angeles School of Law Faculty Scholarship Workshop, Sept. 2005)
  • "Is Attorney Misconduct Gendered? The Surprising Prevalence of Male Attorneys in Disciplinary Proceedings" (Law and Society Association, June 2005)
  • Presenter on panel entitled "Women in Legal Education in the New Millenium" (Law and Society Association, June 2005)
  • The "New" Family Law: A National Symposium on the Socio-Legal Implications of Same-Sex Marriage-moderator and discussant ( Nov. 2004)
  • "Assimilation and Resistance: Emerging Issues in Law and Sexuality" presentation (Sept, 2002)
  • "Looking a Gift Horse in the Mouth: Some Feminist Concerns about a Feminist Proposal to Penalize Adultery in Law" (Law and Society Association, May 2000)
  • "The Future of the Juvenile Court: Does It Deserve to Survive?" (AALS annual meeting, January 1997)
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Conference on the Future of the Juvenile Court, panelist (December 1996)
  • "Beyond the Punishment Versus Rehabilitation Debate: Toward Integrative Justice for Juveniles" (Temple University School of Law, September 1995)
  • Chair and presenter at roundtable entitled, "The Cultural and Political Construction of Subordination: Representing Subordinated People in the 1990's" (Law and Society Association, June 1995)
  • "Cultural Pragmatics and Statutory Interpretation" (Law and Society Association, June 1995)
  • "Missing Children: Law, Ideology, and the Social Construction of Childhood" (Congrès des Sociétés Savantes/ Learned Societies Conference, June 1995)
  • "Struggling for a Future: Youth Violence, Youth Justice" (Harvard Law School and Boston College Law School, December 1994)
  • "Rights Discourse and Political Action" (Law and Society Association, June 1994)
  • "Passports and Passwords: American Immigration Law and Women Asylum Seekers" (Law and Society Association, June 1994)
  • "In a Different Register: Women and Invocation of Rights in Police Interrogation" (Law and Society Association, May 1992)
  • Feminist Jurisprudence Program - workshop on feminist theory and tort law (co-leader of workshop group with Professor Judith Resnik and Ann Scales) (Lewis and Clark Law School, April 1991)

For more information, please visit Professor Ainsworth's Faculty Profile Page.