Prolific Scholars

Professor Lori Bannai discusses her book, Enduring Conviction.

In addition to producing legal writing scholarship, our faculty also conduct research and write in substantive areas of the law.

  • While in practice, Professor Lorraine Bannai was part of the legal team in Korematsu v. United States, an action that successfully challenged Mr. Korematsu's conviction for violating military orders removing Japanese Americans from the West Coast during World War II. In 2015, Professor Bannai's book Enduring Conviction: Fred Korematsu and His Quest for Justice was published. In it, she combines insider knowledge of the case with extensive archival research, personal letters, and unprecedented access to the Korematsu family, and close friends to tell the compelling story of Mr. Korematsu and his journey to the U.S. Supreme Court. Since Enduring Conviction was published, Professor Bannai has spoken around the country on these issues and their application to the challenges facing us today.
  • Professor Deirdre Bowen is a nationally recognized expert in affirmative action, nontraditional families, and the legal system. Her work has garnered awards, such as Best Paper at the National People of Color Conference, been quoted in The New York Times, republished in textbooks, and been cited to in Supreme Court briefs and books- most recently by Professor Laurence Tribe. For her most recent article, This is Your Sword: How Damaging are Prior Convictions to Plaintiffs in Civil Trials?, she conducted an empirical study of juror decision-making, and her conclusions challenged the conventional wisdom about the effect of prior conviction evidence. 
  • Professor Mary Bowman writes in the area of criminal procedure and legal persuasion. For example, her article Full Disclosure: Cognitive Science, Informants, and Search Warrant Scrutiny, posits that cognitive biases play a significant role in the gap between the rhetoric regarding Fourth Amendment protection and actual practices regarding search warrant scrutiny, particularly for search warrants based on informants' tips. The article examines the ways in which implicit bias, tunnel vision, priming, and hindsight bias can affect search warrants.