Programs

Alaska

Alaska Summer Program

Overview

The Alaska Summer Program provides law students with an introduction to Alaska’s unique and compelling legal issues.

  • Earn four law school credits
  • Gain significant legal experience by completing an externship or internship
  • Spend the summer exploring the state’s natural beauty
  • Develop professional connections to help launch your career, in Alaska or elsewhere

Curriculum

As a program participant, you will learn about important legal, social and environmental issues impacting the state. Courses, which alternate from year to year, cover topics such as:

  • Alaska’s constitution
  • Alaska Native Corporations
  • Environmental law and natural resources

Spring 2019 Course

Climate of Change: Alaska's Constitution, Native Corporations and Natural Resources

4 credits
Professor Christian Halliburton, Professor Sam Kalen and Judge Sen Tan

The Alaska summer course examines laws that relate specifically to Alaska, Alaska Natives, and the environment. The specific course offering alternates between years to provide opportunities for students to take the summer course during both their 1L and 2L summers.

The course typically examines the laws governing Alaska Natives combined with Environmental, Climate Change, or Natural Resources law. The course will bring together the history of Alaska and how many of the issues at play before Statehood remain a common and integral thread through to the present day.

Esteemed members from the Alaska legal community will also be invited as guests to several classes so that students have an opportunity to meet and interact with practitioners on the ground in Alaska.

Eligibility

To participate, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a student in good standing at any ABA-accredited law school
  • Have completed at least your first year of law school

Admissions procedure

Priority deadline: January 1
Students are accepted on a rolling basis, so please consider applying as early as possible after application opens on Oct. 1, 2018.

Here is what you will need to submit:

  • Completed application
  • Resume
  • Transcript
  • $300 deposit (non-refundable), payable to Seattle University School of Law
  • For visiting students:
    • We also require a letter from your law school attesting to your good standing. Visit Transfer/Visiting Students for more information.

Alaska 3L Program

Overview

For third-year law students, our 3L program – the only one of its kind offered in Alaska – gives you the opportunity to live, study and work in Alaska for a semester or an entire year. In the process, you can tailor your law school experience to prepare you to achieve your professional goals.

  • Build your network within the legal community
  • Deepen your understanding of complex legal issues and capacity for legal analysis
  • Apply your learning in real world practice contexts, with potential externships across the state
  • Engage with world class legal experts in a small classroom environment

Curriculum

Through a combination of elective courses and externships, you will gain the specialized legal knowledge and professional skills to practice law, in Alaska or elsewhere. Sample courses include:

  • Alaska Constitutional Law
  • Trial Advocacy in Alaska
  • Alaska Criminal Justice: Past, Present and Future
  • Environmental Justice and Policy
  • Government Contracts, SBA Programs and Alaska Native Corporations

Fall 2018 Courses

The Administrative Complexities of Alaska's Natural Resource Landscape

3 Credits
Jon Goltz

This course is designed to familiarize students with the administrative laws, policies and procedures that collectively affect natural resource management in Alaska. Students will learn about the unique regulatory structure that has developed in Alaska, one built upon a complex combination of foundational state laws, such as the Alaska Constitution, the Statehood Act and regulations issued by state administrative agencies, which are then integrated and applied in the broader context of federal statutory law, administrative regulations, and judicial decision. The course will contend with global questions regarding jurisdiction, Alaska Native co-management, subsistence rights, and the scope of federal vs. state regulatory authority, and navigate these many issues down to the case-by-case challenges lawyers and their clients often confront in specific resource management settings. The course will survey the legal issues, policy debates and practitioner considerations that arise with respect to a wide range of Alaska's most precious natural resources, including oil and gas, hard rock minerals, fish and game, air and water. Students will be asked to approach this range of issues from the perspective of multiple attorney roles, including litigator, legislator, counselor, communicator and adjudicator, all with the aim of preparing those students for a career of effective practice in any of these natural resource fields and in an agency-centered practice more generally.

Environmental Enforcement: Investigation, Prosecution and Compliance under Federal Environmental and Wildlife Protection Laws

3 credits
Kevin Feldis

This course will draw upon a series of past case examples and current hot topics to discuss criminal and civil enforcement of federal environmental and wildlife protection laws, including the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, RCRA, CERCLA, the Lacey Act, the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships and other federal laws. In contrast to typical environmental crimes classes, adjunct professor Kevin Feldis will focus on the practical realities and legal strategies for emergency response, investigation, prosecution and compliance with federal environmental and wildlife laws. Professor Feldis is a current law partner at Perkins Coie and a former Federal Prosecutor who spent 18 years investigating and prosecuting individuals and corporations for white collar crimes while working for the U.S. Department of Justice. During his time with DOJ, he handled some of the most complex and unique environmental enforcement matters, including cases involving international shipping and cargo vessels, oil & gas companies, seafood processing facilities, commercial fishing, tourism and mining. This course will include discussions of collecting evidence, the role of whistleblowers, developing probable cause, executing search warrants, the nuts and bolts of the federal grand jury process, drafting indictments, working with experts, arguing motions and taking a case to trial. With environmental compliance in mind, this course will also discuss self-policing and reporting, voluntary disclosure, corporate compliance plans, and third-party corporate monitors. No environmental enforcement course in Alaska would be complete without consideration of cross-border issues, the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea, arctic policy and governance, and the role of the Arctic Council and other international organizations.

Government Contracts, SBA Programs, and Alaska Native Corporations

3 Credits
Christine Williams

This course surveys Government Contracts and the Small Business Administration programs, including Section 8(a), particularly in Alaska. Students will gain an understanding of public law procurement and the policies implicated when the Government enters into contracts with private parties. Topics include instrumentalities of contracting, the Federal Acquisition Regulations, limitations on private and public parties, policy development, and related issues. This course also provides an overview of the SBA's small business programs with an emphasis on contracting programs, regulations, and the application of those regulations, with a particular emphasis on how these apply in Alaska. Students should view this course as a survey course that incorporates practical considerations and applications and provides insights into issues that commonly arise in the Government Contracting field.

Law and Religion

3 Credits
Christian Halliburton

This course is designed to develop deeper familiarity with the major tenets of the First Amendment's religion clauses, and to allow for the exploration of the often-competing normative frameworks that drive their interpretation and application. The course will be facilitated in a hybrid, digitally-mediated format that will combine live classroom engagement with a series learning activities and online interactions. Together, these components allow students to develop their ability to use various modes of First Amendment analysis, to situate and reflect on the historical and evolutionary meaning of Religious Liberty in our constitutional tradition, and to look beyond prevailing doctrine to scrutinize emerging or modern legal challenges involving religious freedom or religious interests. We will utilize a variety of materials, including historical records, judicial opinions and scholarly articles, during the course of study, and students will have an opportunity to contribute to the scope of discussion by engaging in and then sharing some results from independent inquiry into the topic. Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I

Spring 2019 Courses

Climate of Change: Alaska's Constitution, Native Corporations and Natural Resources

4 credits
Professor Christian Halliburton, Professor Sam Kalen and Judge Sen Tan

The Alaska summer course examines laws that relate specifically to Alaska, Alaska Natives, and the environment. The specific course offering alternates between years to provide opportunities for students to take the summer course during both their 1L and 2L summers.

The course typically examines the laws governing Alaska Natives combined with Environmental, Climate Change, or Natural Resources law. The course will bring together the history of Alaska and how many of the issues at play before Statehood remain a common and integral thread through to the present day.

Esteemed members from the Alaska legal community will also be invited as guests to several classes so that students have an opportunity to meet and interact with practitioners on the ground in Alaska.

Eligibility

To participate, you must meet the following criteria:

  • Be a student in good standing at any ABA-accredited law school
  • Have completed at least the first two years of law school

Admissions procedure

Priority deadline:  March 15, 2019
Students are accepted on a rolling basis, so please consider applying as early as possible. Here is what you will need to submit:

  • Completed application 
  • Resume
  • Transcript
  • $300 deposit (non-refundable), payable to Seattle University School of Law
  • For visiting students:
  • We also require a letter from your law school attesting to your good standing. Visit Transfer/Visiting Students for more information.