CAPITAL PUNISHMENT SEMINAR (CRIM-360) 3 credits
This course is divided into substantive and procedural aspects of death penalty law. The substantive inquiry focuses on constitutional and statutory prerequisites to seeking and obtaining the death penalty-since there are constitutional and statutory limitations on the types of crimes, the necessary mental state, and the permissible "aggravating factors" that allow a prosecutor to seek and obtain a sentence of death. The procedural inquiry focuses on those points of criminal procedure that are different in death penalty cases, or particularly important in death penalty cases, such as the procedures necessary to charge the death penalty; the nature of jury selection where "death qualification" is an issue; the fora in which a capital conviction and death sentence can be challenged, including an overview of the claims available on direct appeal; in state post-conviction; and federal habeas.

No prerequisites.

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CIVIL PROCEDURE II (CIVL-325) 2 credits
Advanced subject matter jurisdiction and procedural choice of law; advanced preclusion; advanced aspects of pre-trial and trial practice; appellate practice.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure (CIVL-100).
This is a bar-tested course.
Part of the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum Bar-Tested Course List: Students subject to the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum are required to take two courses off the Bar-Tested Course List.

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CIVIL RIGHTS CLINIC (ADVC-430) 6 credits
The Civil Rights Clinic is a 6-credit, one-semester course offered once each year that allows students to work on important, interesting civil rights issues pending before state and federal appeals courts. 

Recently, clinic students have drafted briefs challenging Arizona's ethnic studies ban; fighting bias in closing argument and the application of the death penalty; and arguing the need for diversity on medical school faculties in a brief filed in the U.S. Supreme Court. The clinic is taught by faculty associated with the Law School's Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality.

Students interested in the clinic should see the instructions for applying for the Civil Rights Clinic, which require you to sign up for the clinic lottery and to submit an application. Please note the minimum grade requirements for applying for the clinic. Students enrolled in Legal Writing II at the time of registration will not be confirmed in the clinic until their Legal Writing II grades are verified. All applicants must attend an information session or watch the information session video. The application here.

For more information about the Civil Rights Clinic, including descriptions of the work of the Korematsu Center and copies of briefs written in its cases, explore the Korematsu Center webpage. You can also contact Professors Lorraine Bannai, bannail@seattleu.edu or Bob Chang, changro@seattleu.edu.

Prerequisites: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200) with a grade of B or better and Legal Writing II (WRIT-200) with a grade of B+ or better.
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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CIVIL RIGHTS ENFORCEMENT (CNLW-377-E) 2 credits
This course will examine the authority of the United States government to investigate and enforce various federal civil rights laws and the policy implications surrounding priority-setting in this area. The topics discussed will include educational opportunity, equal employment, fair housing, and voting, as well as the rights of persons with disabilities, servicemembers, and of all people to be free from hate crimes or unconstitutional policing. Through analysis of specific examples, supplemented by input from individuals with current or past involvement in these enforcement activities, the course will consider the ways in which changing priorities over time have affected the ways in which the government has deployed these crucial powers.

No prerequisites.

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CIVIL RIGHTS LITIGATION (CIVL-335) 2 credits
This is a course for people who want to know how to bring, and how to defend, a civil rights lawsuit. The course will explore the substantial body of law governing Section 1983 suits seeking relief (damages, injunctions, declaratory relief) for the deprivation of federal constitutional or federal statutory rights. We will focus on the elements of claims and defenses available and remedies, including attorney's fees. The course covers doctrines of complexity and sophistication (abstention, absolute and qualified immunity, exhaustion or state remedies, state action, etc.) in a context of current constitutional issues such as restrictions on abortions, searches of cell phones, same-sex marriage, "treasonous" speech, etc. We will begin with some historical background of the Reconstruction-era statutes and their original construction by the Supreme Court, but will principally focus on Supreme Court opinions from the last thirty years. Some attention will also be given to the practical meaning of liberty and property interests under the due process clause.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200).

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CLIMATE CHANGE (ENVL-372) 3 credits
Climate change remains a defining problem for contemporary human civilization, and yet the United States government has begun a very public retreat from the current global consensus around its causes and effects. In this course, we will examine the scientific underpinnings of climate change and its likely consequences, discuss international and domestic responses to the crisis, and debate the political and ethical issues that have arisen, both before and after the current administration took office. We will consider not only laws that have been specifically used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions -- most notably, the Clean Air Act -- but also laws that have been used to raise awareness of the issue, such as the National Environmental Policy Act. Students may also learn about laws governing how fossil fuels are extracted in the United States and how power is distributed across the energy grid.

No prerequisites.

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COLLABORATIVE LAWYERING IN PROBLEM-SOLVING COURTS (ADVC-355, Formerly: Lawyering in Problem Solving Courts) 2 credits
Problem-solving courts Courts are evolving and becoming more popular across the nation. Studies show that these programs can reduce recidivism and return cost benefits to the community. This course will teach students how to use basic lawyering skills within the problem-solving court model.

The class will progress historically from Drug Court, as the foundation, and then to Mental Health Court and Veterans' Court. Students will prepare for class by reading articles, analyzing case law, reviewing videos, observing court, and practicing for simulations. Lecture style classes will feature speakers and class discussion. Simulation classes will allow students to role play and to practice lawyering skills in a variety of different scenarios such as: advising and representing clients, contesting factual and legal issues, negotiating, interacting with a multidisciplinary team, and addressing ethical issues. The instructors will observe, advise, and solicit peer feedback.

The course will require in-class participation, written assignments, and a final presentation. It will be a two credit class, scheduled to meet once per week. The instructors are King County DPD ACAD attorneys: John Drenning, Amy King, Jamie Kvistad, and Heidi Rettinghouse.

No prerequisites.

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLINIC (BUSN-400) 4 credits
A team consulting clinic focused on developing a working relationship with a growing business enterprise. Student teams will deliver business and legal assistance and develop deliverables to empower local entrepreneurs, micro enterprises, startups, and growth stage companies. Clients come from across a wide range of industries ranging from construction to emerging technologies with employees ranging from 1-20. Student teams will select 1 or 2 clients, learn the details of the business and develop statements of work to provide quality work product to meet the needs of their clients. Students participate in a weekly instructional course to learn consulting techniques to develop an active client relationship; business and legal concepts to support their deliverables; and hear from industry experts that expand their understanding of the challenges that all businesses experience at one time or another.

Students are expected to build a relationship with their clients, deliver exceptional work product; and manage a team relationship supported by volunteer business and law mentors and two faculty members. Students should expect to gain real world consulting experience along with opportunities to network with leading professionals in the industry.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course counts towards the professional skills requirement.

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COMMUNITY PROPERTY (PROP-310) 2 credits
This course explores the rights of spouses, partners, and third parties to property acquired during a marriage or a marital-like relationship. Topics include the relationship necessary for creation of community property, characterization of property as community or separate, rights of spouses to manage and control community assets, rights of third parties that can attach to community and separate property, and the disposition of property upon dissolution of the community or death of a spouse or partner.

Prerequisite: Property (PROP-100).

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COMPARATIVE FAMILY LAW (FAML-501) 3 credits
This course will explore and critically examine the intersection of law, family and society. Using various principles of jurisprudence, sociological theory, and empirical research, as well as guest speakers and site visits to places like the Juzgados de Violencia sobre la Mujer (Courts of Violence against Women) to compare and contrast European Union and U.S. models, with a special focus on Spain's progressive approach, as well as models from other countries, of family formation and family dissolution. In addition, this course will examine how race, gender and class mediate relational power in whose family life is defined, regulated, and protected under the law versus whose family is created outside the shadow of the law. Topics included marriage, divorce, parent's and children's rights, "third party" rights, domestic violence, adoption, and reproductive technology.

Given both the compressed nature of the course and its comparative and policy approach, there is no way that all topics covered in a traditional family law course can be explored here. The readings and discussions will include looking at case law, conventions, statutes, and law review articles, and empirical research. The goal is to use this material to understand how to critically examine our own laws as well as others and situate them within a cultural context. In doing so, we can develop more informed policy.

No prerequisites.
This course is part of the Summer in Madrid Program

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COMPARATIVE LAW: THE MIDDLE EAST (INTL-350) 2 credits
Examination of the history, structure, and institutions of Islamic law, civil law, common law, and socialist legal systems in the Middle East. Although several class meetings and individual research may examine substantive law, emphasis is on study of legal systems and traditions. The primary focus will be major contemporary challenges such as the tension between secular civil law and Islamic tradition (with particular emphasis on Turkey, Iran, and Saudi Arabia), the Israel-Palestine conflict, and institution building in Iraq.

No prerequisites.

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COMPREHENSIVE PRETRIAL ADVOCACY (ADVC-300) 4 credits
Using a mock case as a context, students develop patterns of thought and hands-on ability in interviewing, counseling, negotiation, oral advocacy, and drafting of pleadings, discovery, and motions. Problem solving, decision making, and the professional role of the lawyer are emphasized. Alternatives to trial, such as mediation, are discussed. The small size of the class (24 students) allows a high level of student participation in discussion and role-play.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200). Pre or co-requisite: Evidence (EVID-200).
This course counts towards the professional skills requirement.

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COMPREHENSIVE TRIAL ADVOCACY (ADVC-305) 4 credits
Comprehensive Trial Advocacy is an advanced course taught in the context of a mock civil or criminal case. Students use their pretrial skills to integrate theory with trial practice. Students, by role playing and performing in class, learn trial skills: voir dire, opening statement, trial motions, direct and cross examination, closing argument, trial notebook, trial brief, and jury instructions. Organized in law firms, students prepare and participate in a one-day simulated jury trial.

Pre or co-requisite: Evidence (EVID-200).
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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CONFLICT OF LAWS (CIVL-300) 2 credits
A concentration on the problems created for the practicing lawyer by the existence of 51 or more law-making jurisdictions within the United States. The course treats three major problems: (1) choice of the applicable state, national, or federal law; (2) recognition and enforcement of judgments across state lines and national borders; and (3) judicial (service) jurisdiction. The course deals with the "conflict revolution" that has characterized decisional law and scholarship in recent years.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I (CNLW-200)..
This is a bar-tested course.

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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I (CNLW-200) 4 credits
A required four-credit course that introduces students to the Constitution, and constitutional interpretation. Topics include judicial review and the nature of the judicial power; federalism, Congress's powers, and the power of the states to regulate economic activity; separation of powers and the powers of the Presidency; and equal protection and the basic structure of individual rights.

No prerequisites.
Required course. Full-time students must take this course in the fall semester of their second year. Part-time students will take this course in their first or second year.
This is a bar-tested course.

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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II (CNLW-300) 3 credits
A recommended course that offers in-depth coverage of many individual rights issues including the state action doctrine, the First Amendment, substantive and procedural due process, and economic liberties.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200).
This is a bar-tested course.
Part of the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum Bar-Tested Course List: Students subject to the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum are required to take two courses off the Bar-Tested Course List.

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CONSUMER LAW (COMM-310) 3 credits
This course examines issues particular to consumer transactions in formation, substance, and remedies. Topics include: common law consumer issues; FTC and state statutory approaches to consumer protection; constitutional limits on advertising regulation; the Truth in Lending Act; abuses in the marketplace, such as bait-and-switch advertising, pyramid schemes, and unconscionability; Internet-based fraud; the Fair Credit Reporting Act; warranties; privacy; identity theft; spam; spyware; and predatory lending. We will examine the evolution of consumer law as well as the economic and social policies behind it, and also focus on the practical application of the law.

No prerequisites.

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CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN INDIAN LAW (INDL-380) 2 credits
This seminar builds upon material covered in introductory American Indian Law courses. Seminar participants will become familiar with recent and ongoing litigation concerning American Indian tribes in areas such as child welfare, contracting, employment, environmental regulation, natural resources, gaming, land claims, religious freedom, sovereignty, taxation, and breach of trust. Students will learn to identify procedural strengths and weakness of how those cases were litigated. Students will select appropriate case studies for a class hand-out, a class presentation and a 10-page (2900 words) final paper.

Prerequisites: prior course in American Indian law or additional assignment from instructor

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CONTRACT DRAFTING (LPRC-430) 2 credits
This is a course in drafting business contracts, although the general principles of the course will apply to drafting other contractual agreements as well. Students will learn a conceptual approach to contract drafting: as the art of "translating" the business deal, first into contract concepts, and then into the terms of the contract itself. The course will also introduce a general template, or contract "frame," that students can use and modify in constructing contracts.

Much of the course will entail hands-on drafting, as students work through a set of contract drafting exercises. Students will work both in small groups, representing the parties to a contract and negotiating terms, and individually, assembling their own versions of the assigned contracts.

Prerequisite: Contracts (CONT-100/105).
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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COPYRIGHT LAW (INTP-320) 3 credits
An introduction to the major concepts of past and present U.S. and international copyright laws, moving to a more advanced analysis of specific copyright issues in the global entertainment, software, on-line arts, and media industries.

No prerequisites.

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CORPORATE FINANCE (BUSN-315) 3 credits
This is a course on financial principles as applied to complex business and commercial law disputes and transactions. Topics include, among other things, financial statement analysis, the economics of asset valuation, debt and equity investments, and capital budgeting. No previous background in finance or accounting is necessary.

No Prerequisites

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CORPORATE LAW APPELLATE LITIGATION (BUSN-370) 3 credit
Enrollment: Limited to 24 students
Prerequisite: Business Entities
Grading: See detailed explanation below
Meeting Time: Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. (but see discussion below about flexible scheduling)
This is an experiential learning class that uses Delaware corporate law and the Delaware Supreme Court as its laboratory. Each student experiences the roles of appellate attorney, both in the preparation for and the carrying out of, mock oral arguments before the Delaware Supreme Court. Each student also experiences the role of Supreme Court jurist in preparing for and conducting oral arguments (as justices), and in preparing for and writing final opinions in these same cases. These simulations occur in connection with two recent or pending Delaware Supreme Court cases. Students study the actual briefs and appellate record, and are instructed to carry out their work as both advocates and justices with the same skill, diligence and ethics as is observed in the best practices of actual appellate litigators and jurists.

The course focuses on Delaware because it is the "home" for two-thirds of this nation's publicly-traded companies. As a result, Delaware's Supreme Court receives a steady stream of significant cases which are briefed and argued by America's most skilled appellate advocates. The Delaware Supreme Court jurists, and the judges on the Court of Chancery from which its appeals are taken, are universally recognized as the nation's most knowledgeable and skilled business law jurists. Consequently, the Delaware Supreme Court is to corporate law practitioners as the U.S. Supreme Court is to constitutional law specialists - not only the most prestigious practice venue, but also the best place to learn the "ins and outs" of both substantive corporate law and appellate litigation. This course should be of particular interest to any student interested in a commercial litigation, appellate litigation, or corporate law practice (whether transactional or litigation--oriented).

Oral Arguments, Opinions
Delaware Supreme Court Justice. Each student will be assigned to serve as a justice on two mock Supreme Court panels for each case that we study. In this role, each student will write two Supreme Court opinions. Each Court panel will hear oral arguments from two sets of advocates. In preparation for each sitting, student Justices will be responsible for reading all briefs submitted in the actual case, as well as the Chancery Court opinion, key cases or other legal authority cited in either the briefs or Chancery Court opinion, and other pertinent material included in the appendices.

Advocate. Each student will make one formal oral argument in each case representing either the petitioner or respondent. Each advocate will be responsible for mastering the actual briefs and all other pertinent material relating to the case.
Meetings and Arguments

The class is structured to simulate actual law practice and the actual work of Supreme Court jurists (and appellate jurists more generally). In order to adequately prepare for her or his role as mock oral advocate and mock jurist, each student must develop effective strategies for independently and collaboratively organizing and managing legal work. To assess and facilitate this learning, class generally meets in small groups during regular class time and at other times mutually convenient to the instructor and students rather than in a large class setting. Additionally, these meetings focus on developing each student's understanding of the nature of the litigation process from trial court decision to completed Supreme Court opinion, the role of the various actors in that process, and the requirements that ethics and best practices demand of these actors. Finally, these meetings are utilized for ongoing student self-assessment.

Evaluation and Grading
The final grade is based the instructor's assessment and evaluation of the student's professional skills in connection with: (1) work in preparation for mock oral arguments as advocate and as justice; (2) work in preparation for writing a final opinion in the role of Supreme Court justice; (3) conduct of oral argument as advocate; (4) conduct of oral argument as Supreme Court justice and (5) written work produced, including mock opinions.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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CORPORATE TAX (TAXL-306) 2 credits
This course examines the federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, including incorporations, dividends, redemptions, and liquidations. Students interested in general practice, business transactional practice, or business litigation should take both this course and Partnership Tax to gain a comprehensive overview of the taxation of these two primary forms of business enterprise.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300). Recommended but not required: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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CRIMINAL MOTIONS PRACTICE (CRIM-340) 3 credits
This course will teach students advocacy skills at several non-trial stages of a criminal case. Students will perform exercises in some or all of the following: bail hearings, discovery, motions to suppress physical evidence and confessions, and impeachment of witnesses, among other topics and settings. Students will perform in various roles, e.g., defense counsel, prosecution, witness, judge, across the semester.

  • Section A (Portnoy) emphasizes written and oral advocacy;
  • Section E (Goldsmith) emphasizes oral advocacy and does not require written submissions.

Recommended: One or more of the following - Evidence (EVID-200), Criminal Procedure Adjudicative (CRIM-300), Criminal Procedure Investigative (CRIM-305).
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE ADJUDICATIVE (CRIM-300) 3 credits
This course will examine issues of criminal procedure relating to trial as opposed to investigation. Topics addressed include the prosecutor's decision to charge; probable cause review prior to trial; probable cause hearings; grand jury review; the formal charging document, venue, and jurisdiction; the scope of prosecution including lesser included defenses and double jeopardy; speedy trial rights; discovery and disclosure of both prosecution and defense; the law of guilty pleas and law and practice covering the various phases of a criminal trial including voir dire; opening statement; presentation of evidence; motions to dismiss; and opening statement and closing arguments.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar-tested course.
Part of the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum Bar-Tested Course List: Students subject to the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum are required to take two courses off the Bar-Tested Course List.

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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIVE (CRIM-305) 3 credits
This course will examine issues of criminal procedure that arise under the United States Constitution during the investigative phase of criminal cases: arrest, stop and frisk, search and seizure, interrogatories and confessions, informants, eavesdropping, and electronic surveillance.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar-tested course.
Part of the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum Bar-Tested Course List: Students subject to the Bar Success Prescribed Curriculum are required to take two courses off the Bar-Tested Course List.

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CYBERCRIME AND CYBERWAR (CRIM-382) 2 credits
This class will cover principles of criminal law and national security law as applied to computer crimes, with primary emphasis on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The class will begin with an overview of computer trespass laws and their application to computer hacking, and will also include a brief survey of search and seizure/electronic surveillance laws as applied to computers. Other topics covered include national security surveillance law and international law governing information warfare, including recent cases in cyber warfare.

No Prerequisites.

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CYBERSECURITY PLANNING, INCIDENT RESPONSE, AND LITIGATION (INTP-387) 2 credits
Formerly titled: CYBERSECURITY AND DATA BREACH: LEGAL AND PRACTICAL PREVENTION AND RESPONSE
This course explores common cyber-attack threats, including threats from criminal groups, state-sponsored entities, and malicious employees and contractors, as well as ransomware and other cyber-extortion schemes. The course covers the actions organizations should take to decrease the likelihood and impact of security incidents, such as identifying and providing additional protection for valuable data, conducting risk assessments, drafting effective Incident Response Plans, training employees, conducting incident response drills, and purchasing cybersecurity insurance. Students will learn how counsel can assist an organization's managers respond to a cybersecurity incident by engaging a forensic investigation firm under attorney-client privilege when appropriate, working with law enforcement, and guiding incident response team members' communications with executives, Board members, and the media. The course will address the 48-state data breach notification laws and federal, sector-specific notification regulations, including how to meet requirements to notify regulators and affected individuals. The course will train students how to respond to investigations by regulators and by the payment card networks when there is a theft of credit and debit card data. The course will study data security class action cases and appeals from regulatory decisions to determine how judicial decisions should affect how organizations respond to incidents. *Note: Randy Gainer is currently teaching this course.

No prerequisites.

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DISABILITY LAW (DSBL-300) 3 credits
The law of disability discrimination is very broad and covers a myriad of substantive legal areas, any of which could be studied separately in depth. This course will provide an introduction to and survey of the relevant constitutional, statutory, and case law applicable to people with disabilities in the areas of employment, housing, telecommunications, transportation, public accommodation, fundamental rights, and education. The course will provide students with an in-depth understanding of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA); other federal statutes will also be discussed, including the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Fair Housing Act Amendments.

Recommended but not required: Employment Discrimination (EMPL-315).

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DRAFTING FOR CORPORATE FINANCE (BUSN-435) 2 credits
This course covers corporate finance lawyering from a pragmatic perspective. Reading assignments and class exercises will focus on learning how to analyze and draft commercial financing transaction documents, with special attention to how specific contract provisions advance the business objectives of both borrowers and lenders. Special attention will be given to the ways in which corporate, bankruptcy, tax, and other laws influence the structuring and documentation of a typical financing arrangement.

Prerequisites: Business Entitles (BUSN-300) and one of the following: Bankruptcy (BANK-300), Real Estate Transactions (PROP-300), or UCC Secured Transactions (COMM-355).

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IMMIGRATION LAW (IMMG-300) 3 credits
Immigration is governed by a wide range of statutes, regulations, case law, and international treaties. This course critically examines the underpinnings as well as the substantive and procedural contents and policy implications of these various sources of immigration law. In particular, it focuses on the following aspects of immigration: admission, exclusion, deportation of noncitizens; the acquisition and loss of citizenship; the national security implications of immigration law, and state and federal laws regulating the presence of noncitizens often called "alienage laws." The course is also designed to teach basic skills in interpretation of complex statutes and administrative regulations.

No prerequisites.

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IMMIGRATION LAW CLINIC (IMMG-400) 4 credits
Students enrolled in the Immigration Clinic will provide legal representation to clients in immigration proceedings. Students will get involved at various stages of these proceedings, which may include proceedings before Immigration Officers, Immigration Courts, Board of Immigration Appeals, or Circuit Courts of Appeals. The primary responsibilities may include: interviewing clients in immigration custody, investigating facts, conducting legal research, preparing memoranda, motions and legal briefs, and conducting oral argument. The typical advocacy involves disputing the legal grounds for inadmissibility and/ or deportability, and seeking relief from deportation in the form of adjustment of status, cancellation of removal, asylum from persecution (because of race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or social group), and deferral of removal under the United Nations Convention Against Torture (CAT). Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules. Student teams must maintain office hours in the Clinic offices for a total of four hours a week spread over two days. The days and times for office hours will be determined based on each student team's schedule.

Prerequisite: Immigration Law (IMMG-300). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course counts towards the professional skills requirement.

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INDIAN LAND RIGHTS AND ABORIGINAL TITLE (INDL-347) 2 credits
In the last three decades of the 20th century, there emerged a rich and fascinating scholarship by historians from outside of the United States on the Common Law principles and doctrines that governed the land rights of the British sovereign and the indigenous populations of the British colonies. In the late 20th and early 21st century, this scholarship has had a significant influence on tribal land rights in Canada, Australia and New Zealand as well as Malaysia, Belize and southern Africa. So far, however, it has had no impact on tribal land rights in the United States. This seminar will begin with a review of this scholarship and the impact it has had outside of the United States. We will then focus on the development of the law and policy governing Indian land rights in the United States. In part II of the seminar, we will study the checkered and deeply disturbing history of the litigation that resulted in the pivotal and controversial Supreme Court opinion in Johnson v. M'Intosh - the case that defined Indian land rights in this country. In part III of the seminar, we will consider how the doctrine of Johnson v. M'Intosh deviates from established Common Law principles governing the land rights of indigenous peoples and how it influenced the subsequent development of Federal Indian law and policy. In particular, we will look at how the doctrine has been used during different periods of America history to justify politically expedient policies, such as removal, allotment and termination, intended to accommodate the westward expansion of European settlers in the United States and the taking of valuable agricultural and resource-rich Indian lands. In part IV of the seminar, we will focus on the mid-to-late 20th century Indian Claims Commission process and the Indian Land Claims Settlement Acts, both involving the litigation and settlement of Indian land claims arising from (1) the federal government's violation of treaties that recognized tribal land and resource rights in exchange for Indian land and the resettlement of tribes on reservations and (2) State violations of federal law. As a particular example of the former, we will study the local Pacific Northwest case that led to the Puyallup Tribe of Indians Settlement Act of 1989. Finally, the last part of the seminar will explore how the late 20th century scholarship on Common Law principles and doctrines regarding aboriginal title might be used in the United States to reform the doctrine of Johnson v. M'Intosh and influence the development of American Indian tribal land rights in the future. The seminar will not assume any prior knowledge of Indian law. A final paper will be required.

No prerequisites

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INDIAN LAW AND NATURAL RESOURCES (INDL-315) 3 credits
Indian tribes have traditionally relied upon the natural resources for their personal, economic, cultural and religious well-being. Although ownership and access to those resources has been reduced over time, Indian tribes continue to own, and have rights to, a wide range of natural resources. Tribal management of natural resources have, in some instances, become models of wise use, protection and enhancement. This course will explore the basis for tribal ownership of, and rights to, natural resources; the nature and extent of those rights today; tribal managements of those resources; the interface and conflicts among tribal, state and federal agencies over the use and management of these resources; and the implication of selected federal statutes.

No prerequisites.

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INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX (TAXL-300) 4 credits
This course covers the basic concepts, rules, and policy choices involved in the Federal income tax system, including the concepts of gross income, exclusions from income, timing of receipt and recognition of income, deductions, gains and losses from the sale of property, and the basis of computing tax liability. Most other tax courses, as well as courses on pensions and employee benefits, build on the concepts learned in Individual Income Tax.

No prerequisites.

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INSURANCE LAW (INSU-300) 2 credits
The Insurance Law course is an overview of insurance fundamentals-the nature of insurance, its purposes and functions in commerce, and its functions in and effects on tort litigation and recovery. In addressing these fundamentals, the class learns about the insurance contract, its structure, its interpretation, and its use.

No prerequisites.

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INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (INTP-300) 3 credits
This course is a hybrid course administered via Canvas. Students will meet in class six times during the semester (weeks 1, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15); the rest of the course will be on-line. The course will provide a tour of various areas of intellectual property, which is highly relevant to innovation and technology. Course content will concentrate on federal laws of copyright, patent, and trademark, along with quick detours through some state laws, such as right of publicity, trade secret, and unfair competition. The on-line format is especially suitable for students who would like a concise overview of basic IP laws or a general introduction to upper-level IP classes. No technical background is required, and students who majored non-technical areas as undergraduates are encouraged to enroll.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION (INTL-330) 3 credits
If you look at the world's arbitration scorecard today, you will likely see a $28 billion dispute in London between the Russian Federation and private investors; a $ 27 billion dispute in New York between Chevron Texaco and Ecuador; a $1 billion dispute in Geneva between Nigerian National Petroleum and Gulf Petro Trading, etc. The diversity of the parties coupled with the scale and complexity of the transactions make the resolution of disputes through arbitration more attractive than domestic court litigation. While arbitration does not completely displace court litigation, it is now the principal means of the resolution of transnational disputes. This course first looks at the challenges associated with court litigation when the party-litigants are from different jurisdictions and cultures, and then provides an overview of the applicable laws and treaties in international arbitration. It highlights the difficulties associated with cultural diversity in the arbitral process by profiling some of the world's leading arbitral centers. It finally offers a comparative look at problems of enforcement of arbitral awards in selected jurisdictions. At the end of the course, student will be able to see that arbitration is not an alternative means of resolution of translation disputes, it is the principal means, and that lack of familiarity with the basic tenants of this system would be a gap in any lawyer's knowledge operating in today's global marketplace.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW (CRIM-380) 3 credits
This course will cover: the nature and sources of international criminal law; the responsibilities of individuals, states, and others; alternatives to criminal prosecution; defenses; issues of state jurisdiction and fora; extradition and other means of obtaining personal jurisdiction; international cooperative enforcement; international tribunals from Nuremberg to former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, and the Permanent International Criminal Tribunal; and a selection of specific international crimes (e.g., war crimes, crimes against humanity, human rights abuses, and drug trafficking).

Additionally, there will be a strong emphasis on the context(s) in which international criminal justice is meted out. In many cases, states that have experienced serious international criminal violations are also states in transition from one regime to another. The social, economic, and political stability of these regimes heavily impacts upon the demands and priorities of such regimes. This in turn impacts upon their ability to deliver criminal justice. There will also be an attempt to situate the demands for criminal justice alongside the broader set of demands for justice that exist in such societies. By paying attention to this context, it is hoped that the student will have a richer and deeper understanding of the many obstacles set in the way of achieving international criminal justice.

No prerequisites.

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INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (ENVL-340) 2 or 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the role of international law in environmental protection and to a range of issues raised by humankind's ecological impacts. The course begins with an overview of international law and then analyzes and critiques the legal regimes that have developed to address specific environmental crises. Among the crises addressed in the course are global warming, species extinction, destruction of rain forests, and global trade in hazardous waste. Special attention is devoted to the "North-South" conflict over responsibility for environmental protection and to the relationship between environmental protection and trade liberalization. Public International Law is recommended but not required.

Recommended but not required: Public International Law (INTL-300).

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INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CLINIC (INTL-402) 4 credits
The International Human Rights Clinic offers students the opportunity to work with foreign and domestic clients before international and regional human rights bodies. Students will also collaborate with human rights organizations on research and advocacy projects. Furthermore, there may be opportunities to work on cases filed in U.S. courts that incorporate elements of international law.

In addition to project work, the course has a seminar component that presents knowledge and skills essential for lawyers in this dynamic field. The interactive approach covers relevant legal principles, theory, and case law, and--on the pragmatic side--features in-class exercises designed to hone critical skills. The International Human Rights Clinic is a graded course with a substantial time commitment; it may not be taken pass/fail.

Recommended but not required: International Criminal Law (CRIM-380) or Law and Violent Extremist Groups (INTL-373). Restriction: Must meet conflicts of interest rules.
This course counts towards the professional skills requirement.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW AND RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS (INTL-395) 2 credits.
This seminar will focus on the influence of various religious traditions on the development of international law. We will look at the influence of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, and other religious traditions on international law, both historically and contemporaneously. Course requirements: Weekly readings and weekly short papers on the readings.

Prerequisite: One international law (INTL) course or permission of the instructor.

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INTERNATIONAL LAW OF HUMAN RIGHTS (INTL-305) 3 credits
This class will provide a comprehensive overview of the development of modern international human rights law, including the theory, institutions, practice, and procedures of the current human rights regime. The class will look at the various regional and international human rights regimes, as well as the use of international human rights law in domestic courts, particularly in the U.S. We will evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the various procedures open to an international human rights lawyer, and discuss contemporary efforts to strengthen the enforcement of international human rights laws. Some of the questions we will discuss are: What are the most effective mechanisms for addressing current human rights abuses? What are the most effective mechanisms for providing relief to a victim of human rights violations? What is the relevance of international human rights law to domestic U.S. litigation?

No prerequisites.

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INTERNET LAW AND DIGITAL COMMERCE (INTP-330) 3 credits
Formerly titled: CYBERSPACE LAW IN THE MODERN ERA AND BEYOND
In this course, students will survey the business and governing law of the Internet and online commerce. Students will learn the foundations of computers, networks, and the Internet. The course then concentrates on exploring the primary Internet business plans, the intellectual property issues that consume those businesses (including patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks), online transactions and sales, first amendment and social media issues (including free speech, defamation and privacy) and other key Internet business and legal issues (such as online contracting, advertising, jurisdiction, tax and gambling).

No prerequisites

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INTRODUCTION TO FINANCIAL TECHNOLOGY (INTP-367) 2 credits
Financial technology, or "FinTech," is what we mean when we are talking about the emerging and rapidly accelerating use of technology in the financial services sector of the 21st century. Originally, FinTech described the leveraging of information technology to provide back-end services to traditional financial institutions. Recently, however, through a phenomenon often referred to as the "unbundling of banking," FinTech refers to efforts to innovate - even disrupt - the provision of financial services as we have traditionally known them, with major legal implications. We will begin with a discussion of the legal implications of FinTech in the "sharing economy," including the use of blockchain (or distributed ledger) technologies, algorithmic "smart contracts," peer-to-peer systems, and alternatives to traditional notions of money, as well as discussing the difference between both actual FinTech providers and latent ones (i.e., those who don't appear to be financial service providers but actually are). Then we will explore in depth the evolution of the business of banking and other financial services in the new world of FinTech, including FinTech solutions in the areas of trust and custodial services, direct or latent deposit-taking, lending, payments systems, and investment offerings and advising. This will involve an analysis of many applications, or "apps," that are in common use and are well known, plus others which are hidden from the view of the consumer. Finally, the course will survey the various regulatory and policy challenges in the area of FinTech: What laws and regulations affect the FinTech sector? How do we protect the consumer in this new space? How much regulation is enough? Are there challenges presented by FinTech that require new approaches to regulation and new laws to address them? During the course, attention will also be paid to what specific legal skills are required or desirable to practice, directly or indirectly, in this field
Course Materials: Handouts; provided online or in class.

Course Requirements: One research paper (on a topic approved by the professors). Length and grading standards are different for JD, LLM and MLS students.

No prerequisites

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MANAGING PRIVACY (BUSN-377, former title: Managing Privacy Risks) 2 credits
This course will focus on privacy obligations stemming from multiple sources and the design challenges associated with implementing these requirements in a computer system. Open to both computer science and law students, assignments and readings will focus on real world problems in addressing the ethical concerns about our personal information in technical systems.

No prerequisites

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MASS MEDIA LAW AND POLICY (JURS-352) 3 credits
In this survey course, you will examine the law and regulation of electronic and print media. Newspaper, broadcast, radio, cable television, and telephony (including wireless) will be discussed in the context of exploring the constitutional, statutory, public and private regulation of media. You will grow your understanding of common law and statutory concepts such as defamation, obscenity, indecency, privacy, and how those concepts apply to television, radio, print, and cable media. We will also contend with the pros and cons of media consolidation into the hands of fewer
enterprises as we discuss the Federal Communications Commission, and its policies and processes of airwave allocation, licensing and licensing renewal. Finally, you will analyze and discuss the social, political and economic dimensions of media representation of women and minorities, and how law and policy may address (or fail to address) those representations.

There is no final examination however there will be quizzes and other graded assignments. In addition, you will be required to produce a final research paper on a relevant topic of your choice.

No prerequisites.

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MEDIATION SKILLS (ALDR-302) 3 credits
This course covers the practical skills and theoretical knowledge base that are fundamental to representing clients in mediation and to serving as mediators. Such topics include, for example, the components of the mediation process, intake, reframing and other active listening skills, negotiation dynamics, dealing with strong emotions, issues of culture and power, caucus, ethics, techniques for overcoming obstacles and achieving settlement, achieving durability of agreements and closure, and effective advocacy in mediation. Once students become strongly grounded in these fundamentals and skills, at the end of the semester we study how advocates might use many of these mediation and problem-solving skills in a creative new manner of representing clients in settlement negotiations called Collaborative Law. Once a week, the sections of the course meet together to discuss assignments and to observe and to critique skills demonstrations. Later in the week, each section meets in a Lab setting, which provides in-depth practice of mediation skills in a small, supportive environment. Students are graded on a final exam and class participation, which includes such things as class contributions and participation in simulated role plays and self-reflection. There are no prerequisites for the course, but Client Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiations is a very helpful introduction to some of the skills taught. This course meets the law school's requirement of a professional skills development course. It is also a prerequisite for the Mediation Clinic.

No prerequisites.
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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MEDICAL LIABILITY (HLTH-420) 3 credits
The course will examine history, policy, and practice related to liability for medical error. In addition to the doctrines of informed consent and duty-to-treat, students will address many of the practical challenges involved in determining liability of individual providers and healthcare institutions. The course will also look at recent proposals, including some that have been enacted, for health-care-related tort reform.

No prerequisites.

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MERGERS AND ACQUISITIONS (BUSN-305) 2 or 3 credits
This course will begin with a brief overview of the financial techniques used by lawyers, investment bankers, and corporations to evaluate proposed acquisitions of capital assets. We will then consider the possible motivations for such acquisitions. No math is involved and no economics beyond the introductory college level course. The remainder of the course is a consideration of the legal (but non-tax) issues concerning corporate acquisition transactions in both friendly and hostile settings. Some of the doctrinal issues under state corporate law such as the equivalency problem (de facto mergers) and sale of control by a controlling shareholder will be familiar from the Business Entities course. Our consideration of those issues here will be more intense and better informed than in the basic course. Finally, we will examine the federal regulations governing tender offers and proxy contests. Throughout the course a recurrent emphasis is on the lawyer as planner and counselor rather than the lawyer as adversarial advocate.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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MODERATE MEANS PRACTICUM (LPRC-425) 3 credits
Students in this course will learn and apply interviewing, issue spotting, focused legal writing, and practice management skills while working with individuals seeking assistance with family law, consumer, or housing matters. The Moderate Means Program serves the large group of individuals who are financially ineligible for government-funded free legal services but unable to afford to pay market rates for legal assistance. The first six weeks of the Practicum will be devoted to training in substantive law, practical skills, legal ethics, and program policies and procedures. In the second half of the semester, students will interview clients and prepare materials for referrals to attorneys available to take on the actual representation. Three hours of class meeting time are required for the first half of the semester, and eight hours of office-hours a week will be required during the second half.

No prerequisites.
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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NEGOTIATIONS (ALDR- 303) 3 credits
Negotiation skills are foundational to virtually every lawyer's practice, regardless of specialty; whether or not you are prepared, you willnegotiate. This course will address theory and practice, providing the students with foundational skills and experience, as well as the conceptual framework to continue to build their skills through the negotiation experience they accumulate over the course of their careers. Theory and skills will be based on the classic and excellent texts Getting to Yes by R. Fisher and W. Ury of the Harvard Negotiation Project, and Bargaining for Advantage by G. R. Shell of the Wharton Executive Negotiation Workshop. Students will develop practical negotiation skills through simulated negotiation exercises covering a wide variety of complexity and practice areas, ranging from cooperative partnership-formation scenarios to competitive litigation or purchase/sale situations. The course design will include one two-hour session discussing the readings and preparing for the week's simulation, and a second two-hour session devoted to the week's simulated negotiation exercise, obtaining in-depth training from an experienced negotiator. Students will have the opportunity to self-critique, with the aid of some videotaped exercises, in this smaller, supportive environment. Grades will be based on class participation, professionalism, and effort and skill in simulations. There will also be brief written exercises related to the simulations, and brief quizzes on the applicable Rules of Professional Conduct. No exams.

No prerequisites.
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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NOT FOR PROFIT ORGANIZATION CLINIC (TAXL-400) 2 credits
Students in this Clinic will have the opportunity to put their interest in and knowledge of business and tax law into practice. Working in teams of two, students will work with individuals and community groups interested in creating a non-profit organization. Students will counsel their clients on the most appropriate entity for their purposes and prepare and file the documents necessary to create the organization, such as articles of incorporation, bylaws and state and federal tax documents. Students will also advise their clients about the various state laws and regulations with which the clients will need to comply. Students will receive the additional knowledge and skills necessary to do this legal representation in a classroom component. Beginning the third week of the semester, students must also maintain office hours in the Clinic offices twice a week for two hours each session. Office hours will be established based on the schedules of each student team.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Taxation (TAXL-300). Pre or co-requisite: Taxation of Charitable Organizations (TAXL-325); or Nonprofit Organizations, Trust Law, and Philanthropy (ESTA-320); or a two-part, four-hour workshop (will be offered for enrolled students early in the semester). Restriction: Must meet conflicts of interest rules.
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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ONLINE ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH (LRES-360) 2 credits
Online Advanced Legal Research is an online version of Advanced Legal Research (Legal Research Methods). Building on the research fundamentals acquired in Legal Writing I, this course will enhance the student's research skills through instruction on resource selection, research strategies and search techniques. Emphasis will be placed on gaining familiarity and competence with the materials most commonly used by attorneys in day to day practice. We will work with print sources, on-line databases, and free sources of law on the Internet. Cost-effective and efficient research will be stressed.
Because this course is offered completely online with no regularly scheduled class meeting times, students taking this course must be comfortable learning and using new technology platforms. It is recommended, but not required, that students be able to access a physical law library to use certain print materials. Students should expect to spend an average 6 to 10 hours per week working on the course. In addition to readings, students must turn in research assignments each week. During weeks 4 and 8 (of the 8 week course), students will work on exams. These are sets of complex research questions requiring students to conduct research and demonstrate mastery of the skills taught in the previous weeks.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200). Restrictions: Course must be taken pass/fail. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: Advanced Electronic Legal Research (LRES-350); Advanced Legal Research (LRES-300); and Online Advanced Legal Research (LRES-360).

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ORAL ADVOCACY: PRESENCE, POWER & PERSUASION (LPRC-370-A) 1 credit
This four-session course will take students on the journey to effective expression: from sitting in front of the computer to standing before an audience!

Students will practice and develop: 1) Physical Presence: gesture, posture, movement, Ownership of space and time; 2) Vocal Dynamics & Presence: resonance, clarity, warmth, volume, Inflection & emphasis, pace; and 3) How to Connect with an audience through eye contact, phrasing, timing, and emphasis.

Sessions will include individual coaching and feedback, group improvisation, acting techniques, Rhetorical devises as well as exercises & practices in nonverbal skills.

No prerequisites.

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PATENT LAW (INTP-305) 4 credits
This is an introductory course in patent law. It is designed to provide would-be patent lawyers and non-patent lawyers alike with an understanding of the fundamentals of the United States patent law and the work of the United States Patent Office. Topics will include patentable subject matter, the requirements for patentability (utility, novelty, nonobviousness, and enablement), conduct requirements in the U.S. Patent Office, reissue and reexamination of patents in the Patent Office, patent infringement analyses, and remedies for patent infringement, patent licensing and misuse considerations. The cases and materials have been selected so as to focus, where possible, on technologically simple inventions. No technical background is necessary.

No prerequisites.

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PAYMENTS "ECOSYSTEMS" FROM BARTER TO BITCOIN (COMM-300) 2 Credits
Former Title: MODERN PAYMENT SYSTEMS
This course looks at the laws, practices, and institutions affecting our lending, sending, spending, and vending. After a review of the earliest payment instruments, we turn to the until-recently-predominant check, draft, promissory note, and letter of credit. From there, we examine the expanding range of modern payment innovations, including : (1) Electronic funds transfers; (2) prepaid access devices; (3) international remittances and other money transmission; (4) mobile-wallet platform systems; (5) data tokenization; and (6) a brief introduction to virtual currency using distributed ledger (blockchain) technology. This course will cover the numerous statutes governing these diverse forms of payment.

No Prerequisites

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PENSIONS AND EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (3 credits) TAXL-320
This course covers the rules for the formation, maintenance, funding and tax treatment of plans providing retirement benefits (including qualified pension and nonqualified deferred compensation plans), and of "welfare benefit plans" providing current employee benefits, including health and cafeteria plans. We will consider both qualification requirements and fiduciary duties. Our primary focus will be on the tax and labor titles of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA).

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300).

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PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION (ADVC-345) 3 credits
This class introduces students to personal injury claims/ litigation from the plaintiff and defense lawyers' perspectives. The goal is to provide both key substantive law and practical exercises and tips for handling personal injury litigation. Instructors will use video clips and actual case pleadings in course materials and provide hands on experience for students to develop practical critical thinking. Fact patterns will be introduced and used throughout the course and will include premises liability and vehicle accident cases and use Civil Procedure and Rules of Evidence.
Students will learn how to handle personal injury case from beginning to settlement resolution. Since most cases settle, there will be less emphasis on trial and more emphasis on mediation and settlement negotiations, recognizing that the law school has a separate trial practice course.

Prerequisite: Evidence (EVID-200).
This course counts toward the professional skills requirement.

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POLICING, IMPRISONMENT AND JUSTICE (JURS-354) 3 credits.
Since Michael Brown was killed in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2014, discourse about racially targeted policing and imprisonment in the US has proliferated. This course will put current debates in context by exploring interdisciplinary materials that provide critical perspectives on policing, imprisonment and proposals for reform. We will examine policing and imprisonment in criminal punishment systems, immigration systems and psychiatric and medical systems, looking for overlaps and distinctions between how these systems implement policing and imprisonment. We will draw from intersectional feminist scholarship, critical disability studies, anti-colonial scholarship, critical ethnic studies, critical legal studies and queer and trans studies. We will examine contemporary debates about approaches to reforming policing and imprisonment and the role of grassroots social movements in analyzing these systems, building pressure for change, and developing alternatives.

No prerequisites.

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POVERTY LAW (POVL-300) 3 credits
This course aims to create a critical dialogue about the role of law in addressing issues affecting the most impoverished members of our community with a special emphasis on housing, homelessness and racial disparities in access to opportunity and criminal justice. The interdisciplinary course materials that we will be using throughout the semester have been selected to help students engage in critical analysis about the roles government, politics, non-profit policies and the legal community play in perpetuating poverty, and also in constructively addressing it.

The course will explore:

  • specific questions and histories concerning housing, homelessness, policing and imprisonment, public benefits, disaster relief, immigration, and other legal issues facing low-income populations;
  • how societal, governmental, and justice system responses to inequality have resulted in the "silo-ing" of both problems as well as responses to them, resulting in "blindness" to intersecting forms of bias and oppression that compounds unfairness and suffering;
  • how we might conceptualize different ways the law and justice system can ally itself with community-based social movements and governance frameworks aimed at redistributing wealth and life chances instead of perpetuating the unfairness and oppressive conditions perpetuated by the status quo.

No prerequisites.

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PRODUCTS LIABILITY (TORT-300) 3 credits
Products liability law combines the two great common subjects: tort, with its focus on personal injury and vulnerability, and contract, with its basic assumptions about marketplace bargaining and risk allocation. Product liability law has blossomed in only three decades, making it a rich and provocative source for exploring competing legal institutions, law and politics, and law and culture. This course analyzes consumer remedies and theories of recovery in the products area, focusing on the legal effects of buying and using, as well as producing, advertising, and selling consumer products. With its emphasis on problems and on practice concerns, this course is ideal for those who contemplate a civil litigation practice.

No prerequisites.

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PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY (PROF-200) 3 credits
Legal ethics, including lawyer-client relations, lawyer-public relations, and lawyer's responsibility to the legal profession and the courts. Detailed coverage of the ABA Code of Professional Responsibility, cases and materials on professional responsibility, and important Washington law.

No prerequisites.
This is a required course.
This is a bar-tested course.

 

PROTEST, POLICING AND THE FIRST AMENDMENT (JURS-353) 3 credits
In Protest, Policing, and the First Amendment, you will examine constitutional principles in the context of police-involved killings and the social unrest that unfolded in Ferguson, Missouri, Baltimore Maryland, and Charlottesville Virginia, and 2016 Presidential campaign rallies. Freedom of speech, hate speech, incitement, freedom of assembly and association, and the right to petition, as well as qualified immunity doctrine will be explored through Supreme Court cases. As part of this course, you will also learn and apply mass media theories to develop thoughtful critiques of newsgathering, news reporting and news dissemination. Moreover, you will learn to apply critical race theories to rhetorical, visual and aural analyses of media text. Throughout the semester, we will continually evaluate how our readings inform and shape recent socio-legal-political events and issues.

There is no final examination however there will be quizzes and other graded assignments. In addition, you will be required to produce a final research paper on a relevant topic of your choice.

No prerequisites

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PUBLIC INTERNATIONAL LAW (INTL-300) 3 credits
Public international law principally concerns law made by and usually for States. The field deals with many aspects of the functioning of the international community, including activities that occur within or across State boundaries. The course aims to give students a global understanding of public international law, covering the basic concepts, principles, norms and rules that govern relations between States and their interactions with other international actors/objects. As the emphasis is on providing students with critical and practical skills in legal reasoning, research and writing on international issues, the course offers a rigorous foundation for advanced courses in the field of international law. Lectures are presented with particular attention to the impact, influence and development of public international law challenges, through the lens of Third World Approaches to International Law (TWAIL). The core areas addressed are 1) the nature and sources of international law; 2) territory and sovereignty; 3) international law in domestic courts; 4) international Indigenous law; 5) sanctions and the use of force; 6) international human rights law; 7) international humanitarian law; 8) international refugee law; 9) international criminal law; 10) international law of the sea; 11) international environmental law; 12) international trades laws; and 13) international dispute resolution. So, whether a student chooses to go into private practice of law, work as a domestic public lawyer or pursue advocacy in international law, this course will be a valuable asset.

No prerequisites.

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