Courses Titled R - Z

RACE AND LAW (JURS-360) 3 credits
This course addresses law and its relationship to racial justice. Race is one of the fundamental axes of social injustice in the U.S. The legal system operates to create, reinforce and mask racial injustice. Yet law simultaneously provides practical tools to further social justice values. This course should help you develop a deeper grasp of the role law plays in constructing and sustaining "race" and "racism." By understanding this, you can hold our legal system more accountable to its stated constitutional values of due process of law and equal protection of the laws.

Of course, race is not the only category through which unjust power relations are formed. We cannot grasp the full extent of racism without analyzing how it intersects with other "isms" to create larger structures of social oppression; thus we will address other forms of social injustice, such as discrimination based on gender, class, sexual orientation, disability, etc. However, we will always return our focus to unlearning racism, which is so complex that it is a lifelong learning process.

By the end of the semester, you should have some basic information and tools that will allow you to
communicate more effectively with colleagues, clients and other justice system stakeholders who have different racial experiences than yours;
recognize issues of race that underlie our legal, political and social institutions;
analyze the racial content of seemingly race-neutral laws and actions; and
be better equipped to work towards achieving racial justice, in your capacities as lawyers as well as a citizens who want to make a difference.

Course evaluation will be based upon presentations and final papers.

No prerequisites.

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REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS (PROP-300) 3 credits 
(Former title: Basic Real Estate)
This course is an overview of basic legal issues arising from real estate transactions. It covers formation, execution, and enforcement of real estate purchase contracts and the legal issues in the making and enforcing of loans secured by real estate collateral, among other topics.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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REGULATION OF HEALTHCARE QUALITY (HLTH-345) 3 credits
This course will provide an overview of healthcare regulation in the United States that is directly related to the provision of healthcare. The substantive areas that will be explored are the regulation of: physicians and other healthcare providers, hospitals and other healthcare institutions, drugs and healthcare products and human research. Both federal and state based regulations will be examined as well as the managing administrative agencies.

No prerequisites

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REMEDIES (REMD-300) 3 credits
Study of equity, unjust enrichment and restitutionary remedies, proof of damages in personal injury claims, and legal and equitable remedies for deception, duress, undue influence, hardship, unconscionability, mistakes, and breach of contract.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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SECURITIES REGULATION (BUSN-325) 3 credits
The first part of the course will focus on the federal regulation of the offering and sales of securities through private and public offerings. We will cover the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, together with recently adopted amendments and supplements to these laws and their practical effects (i.e. Sarbanes Oxley and JOBS Act). The second part of the course will focus on the federal provisions imposing civil and criminal liability for fraud in connection with the sale of securities, emphasizing a study of the materiality of the elements for recovery, and what is the appropriate measure of damages..

While this course will focus on the relevant statutory and case framework, it will also examine Securities Regulation from the perspective of a practitioner and business person. Issues that will be covered include regulatory issues when attempting to raise funds, practical and statutory considerations when disclosing negative information to the market, how a securities class action is settled, and the most important issue that is not discussed in any textbook.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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SOLO AND SMALL FIRM BUSINESS PLANNING (LPRC-320) 2 credits
Students will explore the various considerations that go into successful business planning, while developing a business plan for their own solo or small law firm practice or law-related business. Class discussions, course material, and guest speakers will provide with a richer appreciation for the practical and ethical elements of developing a business within the legal profession, along with a better understanding of the broader entrepreneurial business planning process.

Recommended but not required: undergraduate or graduate level accounting coursework or Accounting for Lawyers (BUSN-367 or BUSN-500). Title change: Former title was Law Firm Business Planning.

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SOLO AND SMALL FIRM PRACTICE PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT (LPRC-500) 1 credit
In this course, students will address the ethical, professional, personal, and business dimensions of beginning a law practice. Among the topics to be covered are billing, marketing, communication with clients, and identifying viable business opportunities. Students will be expected to prepare an executive summary of a plan for a solo or small firm practice. Students will have the opportunity to meet with a number of practitioners with experience addressing each of the many issues presented in the course.

No prerequisites. Title Change: Former title was Law Practice Planning and Management.

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SPECIAL EDUCATION LAW SEMINAR (EDUL-350) 2 credits
This course will trace the origin and development of special education law since enactment of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1975 and how the legal process has affected the provision and administration of special education. It will examine the multiple sources of law (federal and state, statutory, regulatory, administrative, and judicial) to assess their relative impact and importance and compare the conflict resolution approaches and models used by educators and attorneys. Key concepts of IDEA, such as free appropriate public education, least restrictive environment, and individualized education program, will be analyzed to weigh their underlying validity and evolution. Attendance will be mandatory. Grade will be based on a paper and class participation. Enrollment will be limited to 12 students.

No prerequisites.

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SPORTS LAW (SPRT-310) 2 credits
This course examines various legal issues impacting collegiate and professional sports. Students will analyze sports cases and materials that cover multiple disciplines, including contracts, torts, constitutional law, antitrust, labor and employment, and intellectual property. Students will participate in discussions, problem solving exercises and drafting sessions, which explore areas such as player and coaching contracts and investigation of rules infractions and possible sanctions against universities. Students will augment their learning through analysis and discussion of current sports law developments.

Recommended but not required: Antitrust Law (ANTI-300).

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STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION (TAXL-355) 3 credits
This course will cover the fundamentals of state and local taxation in the United States, including a survey of the substantive law and policy implications of the taxes commonly imposed by state and local governments throughout the United States (i.e., net income-based taxes, ad valorem property taxes, sales and use taxes, and gross receipts taxes and excise taxes). The course will also explore the principal federal limitations on the states' taxing power, including the restraints imposed by the so-called "dormant" or "negative" Commerce Clause of the United States Constitution, as well as the limitations arising under the Due Process, Equal Protection, and Import-Export Clauses, and the affirmative limitations on state taxation imposed by Congress (e.g.., Public Law 86-272 and the Internet Tax Freedom Act). The course will also examine some of the more common limitations on state and local taxation arising under state law (e.g., the uniformity requirement under Washington's Constitution). Finally, the course will introduce the basics of state and local tax practice and procedure. Although the course will generally be national in scope, Washington's unique system of taxation-especially the state's business and occupation tax-will be examined in detail.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300).

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STREET LAW (STRL-300) 3 credits
Second and third year law students are eligible to teach a practical law class to high school seniors and earn credits at the same time. Law students increase their knowledge of the law and improve lawyering skills of communication and critical thinking while contributing to the education of young persons. Street Law challenges law students, requiring them to integrate legal knowledge and skills with new methods of confronting community legal problems. Law students' own legal education is enriched by new perspectives and skills and students also gain tremendous satisfaction from the contributions to the high school students.

Law students teach in teams or solo, two hours per week between 7:45 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. at one of four Seattle high schools, one Redmond high school or two Puyallup high schools. The assigned times are made early in the semester. Weekly seminars prepare law students regardless of past teaching experience to conduct successful classes. Some high schools allow for afternoon classes and some have morning times. It is best to have two one-hour available slots available, plus travel time, for the same time twice per week. The culminating experience is a mock trial in which law students coach the high school students to serve as prosecution/plaintiff and defense teams to compete in a mock trial in local courthouses in front of real judges and attorney evaluators.

No prerequisites.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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TAXATION OF LLCS AND PARTNERSHIPS (TAXL-307) 2 credits
This course examines the federal income taxation of LLCS and partnerships including formation, distributions, and terminations. Students interested in general practice, business transactional practice, or business litigation should take both this course and Taxation of Corporations to gain a comprehensive overview of the taxation of the prevalent forms of business enterprise.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300). Recommended: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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TAXATION OF NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (TAXL-325) 2 credits
This course examines federal and state laws affecting non-profit organizations.  We will explore the life a non-profit from developing the mission or purpose, forming the non-profit, applying for tax exempt status, engaging in typical transactions (such as joint ventures and fiscal sponsorships), and dissolving the nonprofit entity.  Students will gain practical experience drafting Articles of Incorporation, bylaws, governance policies, and other documents. This practical based approach will serve as a framework to explore the tax treatment of public and private charities exempt under I.R.C. § 501(c)(3), as well as business leagues, social clubs, and other types of tax-exempt organizations.  In addition, this course will cover the requirements for federal tax exempt status, restrictions on lobbying and political campaign activities, and the unrelated business income tax.

Pre or co-requisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300).

 

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TRADEMARK ADMINISTRATION LAB (INTP-316) 1 credit
Trademarks are among a company's most valuable assets. This lab course is designed to provide the student with the tools necessary to advise a client in building and managing its domestic and international trademark portfolio. The course addresses such matters as trademark selection and clearance searches; filing and prosecuting trademark applications in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; statutory bars to trademark registration, such as likelihood of confusion and descriptiveness; ex parte and inter parties practice before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board; registration and maintenance of a client's trademarks; and policing and enforcing your client's trademarks. This course must be taken pass/fail. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Trademark Law.

Pre or co-requisite: Trademark Law (INTP-315). Restriction: Class must be taken pass/fail. Meeting Note: Class is generally scheduled to meet for 7 weeks only, starting late in the semester.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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TRADEMARK LAW (INTP-315) 2 credits
This course focuses on the day-to-day realities of trademark practice, including the origin, nature, and extent of trademark rights; what constitutes "use" of a trademark for purposes of ownership, enforcement, and liability; the protectability of nontraditional trademarks such as colors and configurations; client counseling and resolving trademark disputes; protecting and enforcing trademark rights; and the limitations on trademark protection. Along the way, the course addresses such related areas of law as federal and common law of unfair competition and deceptive advertising, trade dress, rights of publicity, Internet domain names, and uses of trademarks in Web advertising.

No prerequisites.

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TRADEMARK LAW CLINIC (INTP-415) 3 credits
Students represent clients who are seeking federal protection for their trademark. Students will advise clients on the selection and adoption of trademarks and work with them to file a federal trademark application with the United States Patent and Trademark Office. Students will be responsible for preparing a trademark clearance search, filing a federal trademark application, responding to any inquiry or refusal from the US Trademark Office, filing maintenance documents, and the preparation of any other documents or filings necessary in the course of prosecuting and maintaining a federal trademark application or registration. Student teams must maintain office hours in the Clinic offices for a total of three hours per week. Office hours must be scheduled on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2 to 7 pm or Wednesdays from Noon to 8PM. The days and times for office hours will be determined based on each student team's schedule. Students will be required to attend a clinic class two days per week.

Prerequisite: Intellectual Property (INTP-300). Recommended: Trademark Law (INTP-315). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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TRANSITIONING TO PRACTICE: TOOLS AND RESOURCES FOR PRACTICE IN WASHINGTON STATE COURTS (WITH AN EMPHASIS ON KING COUNTY) (LPRC-305) 1 credit
The course is designed to provide practical and concrete knowledge of "how to" practice in Washington State courts, and King County Superior Court in particular. The focus of this course is "real life" skills that you will put to everyday use and is taught by Washington Supreme Court Justice Mary Yu, a former King County Superior Court Judge for fourteen years, and Stephanie Jensen, a practicing litigator and SU Law alumna. The course will introduce students to the structure of Washington's court system, state and local court rules, case and client management skills, discovery, motion practice, and trial practice. Students will also learn basic skills like how to file a motion and where their motion will be heard, and practical tips on oral argument and the presentation of evidence to a judge or jury. Two hours of in-court observation and a short reflection paper will be required. Although the primary focus of the course is on King County Superior Court, students will also receive an overview of other Washington courts. Justice Yu will also share some tips on appellate oral argument.

Mandatory course materials include: Local Rules of the Superior Court for King County, Washington State Court Rules for Superior Court, Washington Rules of Evidence, and Washington Rules of Professional Conduct (all available electronically).

In Spring 2016 The class will meet on:

Friday, March 4, 2016 - 4:00 to 6:00 pm King County Courthouse tour and introduction to class
Saturday, March 5, 2016 - 10:00 am to 12:00 pm Seattle U Law School, Annex 142
April 2, 2016 - 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Seattle U Law School, Annex 142
April 9, 2016 - 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Seattle U Law School, Annex 142

Restrictions: Must be graduating in Spring or the following Summer or Fall. This course must be taken pass/fail. Meeting Note: The class will meet in four sessions and include Saturday dates. To receive credit, students must attend all class sessions.

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TRIBAL ADMINISTRATION LAW (INDL-345/INDL-610) 2 credits
This course will provide an overview of the integration and application of strategic and operational management principles in tribal governments. Topics will include the development of goals, strategies, and approaches to implementation. The course will focus on tribal strategic plans and issues specific to tribes, such as the federal-tribal relationship, tribal constitutions, and tribal ordinances and regulations. This course will provide an overview of organizational management theories with an emphasis on tribal governments. It will focus on the various types of tribal governments, the role of tribal managers, tribal management functions, communications processes, and management information systems design and development. It will also explore different models of delivering services on reservations.

No prerequisites.

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TRIBAL GOVERNMENTAL GAMING (INDL-330) 2 credits

This seminar will review the legal, political and social forces that led to the enactment of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (IGRA) and examine the implementation of the Act. The course covers all of the major issues involved in IGRA, including: management contracts; the powers of the National Indian Gaming Commission; the classification of various gaming activities; tribal authority over gaming; the role of the states in the regulation of Indian gaming; and the determination of where Indian gaming facilities may be located. Requirements for the course include informed class participation and the preparation of a research paper. The Federal Indian Law course is not a prerequisite, but it will be helpful in understanding the concepts involved in IGRA and the issues that have arisen in the implementation of the Act.

No prerequisites.

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TRIBES AND TAXES (INDL-337) 2 credits
This course will examine the leading Native American tax cases. The class will address the policy, legal, and regulatory framework surrounding Tribal taxation, federal taxation of members and tribes, special federal rules, fishing rights, Indian Tax Status Act, tribal bonds, rapid depreciation rules, Indian jobs credit, and special rules for gaming; state taxation of tribes, members, and non-members and tribal taxation. Topics include the problem of multiple taxation, federal Indian liquor laws, and fuel and tobacco taxes.

No prerequisites.

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TRUSTS AND ESTATES (ESTA-300) 3 credits
This course, which stands on its own as a survey course and also serves as an introduction to Estate Planning, covers the law of wills, trusts, and intestate succession. It includes execution and revocation of wills; creation, modification, and termination of trusts; problems of construction; restrictions on testation and transfers in trust; and future interests. The course covers some aspects of fiduciary administration, but not taxation.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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TRUSTS, ESTATES AND ENHANCED ANALYTICAL SKILLS (ESTA-250) 4 credits
This course, which stands on its own as a survey course and also serves as an introduction to Estate Planning, covers the law of wills, trusts, and intestate succession. It includes execution and revocation of wills; creation, modification, and termination of trusts; problems of construction; restrictions on testation and transfers in trust; and future interests. The course covers some aspects of fiduciary administration, but not taxation. In addition, this class includes a lab, in which students will hone their analytical skills through weekly writing assignments focused on synthesizing the materials that were addressed in class.

No prerequisites.
Students in the bottom 25% of the first-year class are required to take this course in the spring of their 2L year.

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UCC SALES (COMM-350) 3 credits
The course covers the law governing the sales of tangible personal property. The course deals with contracts for the sale of goods, involving issues that generally are not dealt with in first year contracts. The course covers shipment of the goods when the parties are at a distance and the risk of loss should the goods be damaged or destroyed prior to acceptance by the buyer. Of central importance is the seller's obligations with respect to the quality of and title to the goods. Discussed under this topic are the creation and content of express and implied warranties; the manner in which they may be modified or disclaimed; and the contractual alterations the parties can make to the remedies provided by the law. The course also treats the buyer's right to reject or revoke acceptance of non-conforming goods; the buyer's and seller's remedies in the event of breach; and the right of the buyer or seller to reclaim goods from an insolvent seller or buyer. Although the central source of law for this portion of the course is Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code, the course also will consider the interface between the Code and products liability law.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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UCC SECURED TRANSACTIONS (COMM-355) 3 credits
The course covers the law pertaining to security interests in personal property. The course addresses the manner in which parties can create interests in personal property to secure the payment of a debt and the consequences of creating such an interest. Discussed are the manner of creating and perfecting security interests; priorities among secured parties; priorities between secured creditors and unsecured creditors and purchasers; and the remedies that exist in the event of default or improper seizure of the secured property. The course also considers the scope of Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, which governs secured transactions, attending to such issues as leases that are intended for security and consignments of goods. In addition to treating these issues under Article 9, the course considers the effects of the Bankruptcy Act upon security interests when the debtor is in bankruptcy proceedings with emphasis upon such issues as voidable and preferential transfers.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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WASHINGTON STATE ADMINISTRATIVE AND REGULATORY LAW AND POLICY (ADMN-360) 3 credits
A course designed to expose students to the particular laws, regulations, procedures, and institutions of Washington State's administrative and regulatory bodies. This course will provide a thorough training in the basic structures and substantive and procedural law in these areas, and will also introduce students to some of the most important contemporary players, interests, and issues through problems, guest speakers, and field trips.

No prerequisites.
This course is part of the Semester in Olympia curriculum.

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WASHINGTON STATE CONSTITUTIONAL LAW SEMINAR (CNLW-315) 2 credits
This course will combine theoretical and practical analysis of the Washington State Constitution. The course will be relevant to students who intend to practice in Washington, particularly those whose practices will involve state government, judicial decision-making, lawmaking, or politics. Theoretical aspects of the course will examine the structure, content, role, and interpretation of state constitutions. The practical component will survey and analyze the state constitutional provisions and rulings of interest to Washington practitioners. The course will be structured around the three overlapping aspects of the Washington State Constitution: the personal constitution (individual rights), the political constitution (allocation of political power), and the working constitution (functions of and limitations on state government).

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I (CNLW-200).

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WATER LAW (ENVL-350) 3 credits
The development of water resources and the growth of the law in the context of scarcity and competition between instream resources and the demands of population growth is the focus of this course. Materials and discussion will emphasize the fundamental principles of ownership and rights to use water, primarily concentrating on western water law and the prior appropriation doctrine. Students will study a range of issues and topics including irrigation rights and municipal use, tribal and federal reserved water rights, the public trust doctrine, and the politics of water law. State water rights in the context of federal laws such as the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act will be covered as well.

No prerequisites.

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WORKERS' RIGHTS CLINIC (EMPL-420) 6 credits
The Worker's Right Clinic is offered through a partnership with Seattle University School of Law and the Fair Work Center. Students in the Worker's Rights Clinic will help low wage workers understand and enforce their workplace rights. Though the clinic will offer services to all workers, special emphasis will be placed on understanding and enforcing Seattle's minimum wage, paid sick and safe leave and ban-the-box protections. Students will engage in three major areas of client work: (1) initial interviews with workers to help with issue identification and legal information; (2) periodic community clinics, providing counseling and brief advice to workers; and (3) representation of workers in employment claims through an administrative or judicial processes. Students may also work on policy advocacy and impact litigation. While students are engaged in this representation, students will also study foundational employment doctrine, reinforce their skill development, and examine the causes and consequences of income inequality in the United States.

Recommended but not required: Employment Law (EMPL-300) or Labor Law (EMPL-350). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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WORKPLACE HEALTH AND SAFETY (EMPL-330) 3 credits
The course examines the legal mechanisms aimed at reducing the incidence of work-related illnesses and accidents, and providing compensation for workers disabled by occupational injuries and diseases. It will first cover workers' compensation, a statutory scheme that eliminates the employer's common-law duty in tort to provide covered workers with a reasonably safe place to work, and replaces it with an obligation on the part of employers to pay, on a non-fault basis, fixed benefits to employees disabled by accidents or illness that arise out of and in the course of the employment, and to the families of workers killed by job-connected accidents or diseases.

Special attention will be paid to the various issues that arise in determining whether or not the particular injury or illness was a compensable event as designated by the statute and whether or not the disability was in fact causally related to the employment.

The course will also focus on the interrelationship between worker compensation and tort law in two discrete contexts: first, when the employee seeks to avoid the exclusivity of the worker compensation remedy by claiming that her injury was not covered by the statute, and therefore she can sue her employer in tort (as often occurs when the employer is sued for allegedly committing an intentional tort against the employee), and second, in the interface between worker compensation and product liability law, when a worker injured on the job brings a product liability suit against a manufacturer, and the manufacturer tries to allocate all or part of the loss to the employer.

The course will also cover the law of occupational safety and health, as embodied in the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA), which authorizes the Department of Labor to set mandatory standards meant to reduce work-related injuries and illnesses, and imposes a general duty on employers to maintain safe working conditions. The process by which standards are set, judicial review of standards and enforcement of the standards will be examined.

The course will be useful for students who plan to specialize in personal-injury law or employment law, or who intend to be general practitioners.

Prerequisite: Torts (TORT-100/105). Recommended but not required: Administrative Law (ADMN-300).

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YOUTH ADVOCACY CLINIC (ADVC-310) 6 credits
Students in the clinic represent clients in a variety of matters. Our client list includes: (1) individuals charged as juvenile offenders; (2) unaccompanied immigrant minors seeking Special Immigrant Juvenile Status; (3) individuals seeking relief from the obligation to register as juvenile sex offenders. The seminar component of the clinic offers a sequence of simulations of the necessary lawyering skills, including a simulated Motion Hearing before an actual judge (on a Saturday, usually at the end of the sixth week of the term).

Prerequisite: Evidence (EVID-200). Pre or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (PROF-200). Restrictions: Must be Rule 9 eligible. Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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