Courses Titled C - D

CANNABIS LAW AND POLICY (BUSN-347) 2 credits
This course examines Washington's marijuana rules and regulations, how these rules shape and define business planning and development, and how they compare to the rules and regulations of our state's legalization brethren, including Colorado and Oregon. In addition, the course will consider Washington's current regulatory environment in the broader context of marijuana decriminalization and legalization over the past twenty years, as well as the industry's unique legal challenges and uncertainties resulting from the conflict between federal and state law. The course will present a case study through which students will see the progression of issues that must be addressed in bringing cannabis law business from idea to operating entity.

No prerequisites.

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CAPITAL PUNISHMENT SEMINAR (CRIM-360) 3 credits
This course is divided into substantive and procedural aspects of death penalty law. The substantive inquiry focuses on constitutional and statutory prerequisites to seeking and obtaining the death penalty-since there are constitutional and statutory limitations on the types of crimes, the necessary mental state, and the permissible "aggravating factors" that allow a prosecutor to seek and obtain a sentence of death. The procedural inquiry focuses on those points of criminal procedure that are different in death penalty cases, or particularly important in death penalty cases, such as the procedures necessary to charge the death penalty; the nature of jury selection where "death qualification" is an issue; the fora in which a capital conviction and death sentence can be challenged, including an overview of the claims available on direct appeal; in state post-conviction; and federal habeas.

No prerequisites.

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CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES ON THE LAW (JURS-317) 3 credits
The course will explore the relationship between law and theology and their similarities and dissimilarities. Among the topics that will be discussed are theological accounts of law, the influence of theology on the development of law, the impact of law on theology, theological and legal concepts of the person, and the legal profession as vocation. The course will concentrate almost exclusively on Christian theology.

No prerequisites.

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CIVIL PROCEDURE II (CIVL-325) 2 credits
Advanced subject matter jurisdiction and procedural choice of law; advanced preclusion; advanced aspects of pre-trial and trial practice; appellate practice.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure (CIVL-100).
This is a bar tested course.

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CIVIL RIGHTS AMICUS CLINIC (ADVC-430) 6 credits
The Civil Rights Amicus Clinic is a 6-credit, one-semester course offered once each year that allows students to work on important, interesting civil rights issues pending before state and federal appeals courts. The clinic will be offered during the fall of 2017 on Tuesday/Thursday 2-3:15 pm.

Recently, clinic students have drafted briefs challenging Arizona's ethnic studies ban; fighting bias in closing argument and the application of the death penalty; and arguing the need for diversity on medical school faculties in a brief filed in the U.S. Supreme Court. The clinic is taught by faculty associated with the Law School's Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality.

Students interested in the clinic should see the instructions for applying for the Civil Rights Amicus clinic, which require you to sign up for the clinic lottery and to submit an application. Please note the minimum grade requirements for applying for the clinic. Students taking Legal Writing II in the Spring 2017 will not be confirmed in the clinic until their Legal Writing II grades are verified. All applicants must attend an information session or watch the information session video. The instructions for applying may be found here.

For more information about the Civil Rights Amicus Clinic, including descriptions of the work of the Korematsu Center and copies of briefs written in its cases, explore the Korematsu Center webpage. You can also contact Professors Lorraine Bannai, bannail@seattleu.edu or Bob Chang, changro@seattleu.edu.

Prerequisites: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200) with a grade of B or better and Legal Writing II (WRIT-200) with a grade of B+ or better.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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CIVIL RIGHTS LITIGATION (CIVL-335) 2 credits
This is a course for people who want to know how to bring, and how to defend, a civil rights lawsuit. The course will explore the substantial body of law governing Section 1983 suits seeking relief (damages, injunctions, declaratory relief) for the deprivation of federal constitutional or federal statutory rights. We will focus on the elements of claims and defenses available and remedies, including attorney's fees. The course covers doctrines of complexity and sophistication (abstention, absolute and qualified immunity, exhaustion or state remedies, state action, etc.) in a context of current constitutional issues such as restrictions on abortions, searches of cell phones, same-sex marriage, "treasonous" speech, etc. We will begin with some historical background of the Reconstruction-era statutes and their original construction by the Supreme Court, but will principally focus on Supreme Court opinions from the last thirty years. Some attention will also be given to the practical meaning of liberty and property interests under the due process clause.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200).

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CLIENT COUNSELING AND NEGOTIATION (ALDR-301) 3 credits
Clients present a complex array of emotions, needs, perspectives, practical constraints, and goals. What happens when the lawyer ignores, or fails to understand or address, the real concerns driving his or her client? What is the appropriate balance between focusing on legal and non-legal concerns? Should the lawyer even address the "non-legal issues," and if so, how does one do so without overstepping one's role and training? How does one effectively negotiate settlement of cases? Client Counseling and Negotiation (ALDR-301) draws on cutting-edge theory and the skill set used in the Mediation, Collaborative Law, and Negotiation disciplines to address such questions. This skills course covers client counseling skills, such as fundamentals of helping relationships; active listening; effective questioning; uncovering hidden interests; balance of power; client counseling ethics; decision-making; and establishing the appropriate attorney-client relationship, including psychological, moral, and spiritual dimensions. Because most suits are settled out of court, we next study Negotiation, including conflict theory; preparation for negotiation; how to evaluate best alternatives to settlement ("BATNAs"); the 5 conflict resolution styles (competitive; integrative, etc.); where to set first offers; information exchange; negotiating strategy and techniques; obstacles and impasse and how to overcome them; negotiating ethics; and how to use negotiations as durable and effective problem solving. Course design: In the "larger group" portion of the course, which is typically a Monday class, the students enrolled in the different sections of PSI meet collectively to discuss the week's assigned readings. In the Lab portion of the course, which is a "double class" (100 minutes) later in the week, students apply that reading in actual (simulated) client counseling and negotiation settings, obtaining in-depth training in these skills. Students have the opportunity to self-critique, with the aid of some videotaped exercises, in this smaller, supportive environment. Grades are based on class participation (preparation, answers and volunteer comments, etc.), professionalism (attendance, being on time, collaboration, etc.), effort and skill, exercises, and a conflict journal.

No prerequisites.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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CLIMATE CHANGE (ENVL-372) 3 credits
Climate change remains a defining problem for contemporary human civilization, and yet the United States government has begun a very public retreat from the current global consensus around its causes and effects. In this course, we will examine the scientific underpinnings of climate change and its likely consequences, discuss international and domestic responses to the crisis, and debate the political and ethical issues that have arisen, both before and after the current administration took office. We will consider not only laws that have been specifically used to reduce greenhouse gas emissions -- most notably, the Clean Air Act -- but also laws that have been used to raise awareness of the issue, such as the National Environmental Policy Act. Students may also learn about laws governing how fossil fuels are extracted in the United States and how power is distributed across the energy grid.

No prerequisites.

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COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP CLINIC (BUSN-400) 4 credits
A team consulting clinic focused on developing a working relationship with a growing business enterprise. Student teams will deliver business and legal assistance and develop deliverables to empower local entrepreneurs, micro enterprises, startups, and growth stage companies. Clients come from across a wide range of industries ranging from construction to emerging technologies with employees ranging from 1-20. Student teams will select 1 or 2 clients, learn the details of the business and develop statements of work to provide quality work product to meet the needs of their clients. Students participate in a weekly instructional course to learn consulting techniques to develop an active client relationship; business and legal concepts to support their deliverables; and hear from industry experts that expand their understanding of the challenges that all businesses experience at one time or another.

Students are expected to build a relationship with their clients, deliver exceptional work product; and manage a team relationship supported by volunteer business and law mentors and two faculty members. Students should expect to gain real world consulting experience along with opportunities to network with leading professionals in the industry.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300). Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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COMMUNITY PROPERTY (PROP-310) 2 credits
This course covers the relationship necessary for creation of community property, classification of property as community or separate, management and control of community assets, rights of creditors to reach community and separate property, and disposition of property upon dissolution of the community.

No prerequisites.

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COMPARATIVE FAMILY LAW (FAML-501) 3 credits
This course will explore and critically examine the intersection of law, family and society. Using various principles of jurisprudence, sociological theory, and empirical research, as well as guest speakers and site visits to places like the Juzgados de Violencia sobre la Mujer (Courts of Violence against Women) to compare and contrast European Union and U.S. models, with a special focus on Spain's progressive approach, as well as models from other countries, of family formation and family dissolution. In addition, this course will examine how race, gender and class mediate relational power in whose family life is defined, regulated, and protected under the law versus whose family is created outside the shadow of the law. Topics included marriage, divorce, parent's and children's rights, "third party" rights, domestic violence, adoption, and reproductive technology.

Given both the compressed nature of the course and its comparative and policy approach, there is no way that all topics covered in a traditional family law course can be explored here. The readings and discussions will include looking at case law, conventions, statutes, and law review articles, and empirical research. The goal is to use this material to understand how to critically examine our own laws as well as others and situate them within a cultural context. In doing so, we can develop more informed policy.

No prerequisites.
This course is part of the Summer in Madrid Program

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COMPARATIVE LAW: THE MIDDLE EAST (INTL-350) 2 credits
Examination of the history, structure, and institutions of Islamic law, civil law, common law, and socialist legal systems in the Middle East. Although several class meetings and individual research may examine substantive law, emphasis is on study of legal systems and traditions. The primary focus will be major contemporary challenges such as the tension between secular civil law and Islamic tradition (with particular emphasis on Turkey, Iran, and Saudi Arabia), the Israel-Palestine conflict, and institution building in Iraq.

No prerequisites.

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COMPREHENSIVE PRETRIAL ADVOCACY (ADVC-300) 4 credits
Using a mock case as a context, students develop patterns of thought and hands-on ability in interviewing, counseling, negotiation, oral advocacy, and drafting of pleadings, discovery, and motions. Problem solving, decision making, and the professional role of the lawyer are emphasized. Alternatives to trial, such as mediation, are discussed. The small size of the class (24 students) allows a high level of student participation in discussion and role-play.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200). Pre or co-requisite: Evidence (EVID-200).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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COMPREHENSIVE TRIAL ADVOCACY (ADVC-305) 4 credits
Comprehensive Trial Advocacy is an advanced course taught in the context of a mock civil or criminal case. Students use their pretrial skills to integrate theory with trial practice. Students, by role playing and performing in class, learn trial skills: voir dire, opening statement, trial motions, direct and cross examination, closing argument, trial notebook, trial brief, and jury instructions. Organized in law firms, students prepare and participate in a one-day simulated jury trial.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200). Pre or co-requisite: Evidence (EVID-200).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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CONFLICT OF LAWS (CIVL-300) 2 credits
A concentration on the problems created for the practicing lawyer by the existence of 51 or more law-making jurisdictions within the United States. The course treats three major problems: (1) choice of the applicable state, national, or federal law; (2) recognition and enforcement of judgments across state lines and national borders; and (3) judicial (service) jurisdiction. The course deals with the "conflict revolution" that has characterized decisional law and scholarship in recent years.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I (CNLW-200) 4 credits
A required four-credit course that introduces students to the Constitution, and constitutional interpretation. Topics include judicial review and the nature of the judicial power; federalism, Congress's powers, and the power of the states to regulate economic activity; separation of powers and the powers of the Presidency; and equal protection and the basic structure of individual rights.

No prerequisites.
This required Course must be taken in fall semester of the second year.
This is a bar tested course.

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CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II (CNLW-300) 3 credits
A recommended course that offers in-depth coverage of many individual rights issues including the state action doctrine, the First Amendment, substantive and procedural due process, and economic liberties.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law (CNLW-200).
This is a bar tested course.
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CONSTRUCTION LAW (PROP-320) 2 credits
This course is intended to provide a broad overview of basic concepts in construction law. It is anticipated that the following topics will be covered: contract formation; design professional liability; owner liability (interference, plan adequacy, coordination of multiple primes); contractor liability (site inspection, job site safety); construction changes and contractor claims (differing site conditions, acceleration, lost productivity, delays, defects, cardinal change, change orders); negligence and warranty claims; issues in subcontracts (paid-when-paid and conduit clauses); time (notice to proceed, substantial completion, scheduling clause, notice of claims); limitations of liability, disclaimers and indemnification; termination; liens; statute of limitations and repose; damages (actual, liquidated, mitigation, economic loss rule, quantum meruit, rescission); and technology and liability in design and construction. Emphasis will be placed on coverage of the topics generally rather than on detailed analysis of any one area.

No prerequisites.

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CONSUMER LAW (COMM-310) 3 credits
This course examines issues particular to consumer transactions in formation, substance, and remedies. Topics include: common law consumer issues; FTC and state statutory approaches to consumer protection; constitutional limits on advertising regulation; the Truth in Lending Act; abuses in the marketplace, such as bait-and-switch advertising, pyramid schemes, and unconscionability; Internet-based fraud; the Fair Credit Reporting Act; warranties; privacy; identity theft; spam; spyware; and predatory lending. We will examine the evolution of consumer law as well as the economic and social policies behind it, and also focus on the practical application of the law.

No prerequisites.

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CONSUMER ADVOCACY CLINIC (ADVC-410) 4 credits
Everyday citizens face challenges with debt and debt collection. Medical, student loan and credit card debt cases flood the courts, yet many citizens go unrepresented in those cases. Another type of debt-legal financial obligations (LFOs)-also impact everyday citizens. The turmoil in Ferguson, Missouri brought to light systemic concerns beyond endemic issues of law enforcement and race. The U.S. Justice Department's examination of its Municipal Court revealed how actors in that system imposed fines, fees and other LFOs to finance government operations and leave citizens in a downward spiral of carceral debt. The disproportionate and collateral impacts of debt collection practices upon the poor are stark-affecting their creditworthiness, interest rates, and social security. For those formerly incarcerated citizens with lingering LFOs, they face those adverse consequences and more: hurdles to secure housing and employment, family reunification barriers, and perpetual supervision and control by the court system.

In the Consumer Advocacy Clinic, you will represent clients in debt collection defense, and those seeking remittance or waiver of their LFOs. You will have the chance to engage a wide range of civil practice on behalf of your clients: factual investigation, pleading and discovery, counseling, negotiation, and pretrial or settlement conferences. You will also engage in projects involving consumer rights. If you enroll, you must attend the classroom sessions and maintain office hours in the Law Clinic. As you will be conducting pre-trial motions, discovery, hearings, and perhaps trials under supervision, you must be Rule 9 eligible

Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility. Restrictions: Must be Rule 9 eligible. Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.

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CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN INDIAN LAW (INDL-380) 2 credits
This seminar builds upon material covered in introductory American Indian Law courses. Seminar participants will become familiar with recent and ongoing litigation concerning American Indian tribes in areas such as child welfare, contracting, employment, environmental regulation, natural resources, gaming, land claims, religious freedom, sovereignty, taxation, and breach of trust. Students will learn to identify procedural strengths and weakness of how those cases were litigated. Students will select appropriate case studies for a class hand-out, a class presentation and a 10-page (2900 words) final paper.

Prerequisites: prior course in American Indian law or additional assignment from instructor

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CONTRACT DRAFTING (DRFT-305) 2 credits
This is a course in drafting business contracts, although the general principles of the course will apply to drafting other contractual agreements as well. Students will learn a conceptual approach to contract drafting: as the art of "translating" the business deal, first into contract concepts, and then into the terms of the contract itself. The course will also introduce a general template, or contract "frame," that students can use and modify in constructing contracts.

Much of the course will entail hands-on drafting, as students work through a set of contract drafting exercises. Students will work both in small groups, representing the parties to a contract and negotiating terms, and individually, assembling their own versions of the assigned contracts.

No prerequisites. Restriction: This course must be taken pass/fail.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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COPYRIGHT LAW (INTP-320) 3 credits
An introduction to the major concepts of past and present U.S. and international copyright laws, moving to a more advanced analysis of specific copyright issues in the global entertainment, software, on-line arts, and media industries.

No prerequisites.

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CORPORATE GOVERNANCE (BUSN-340) 2 or 3 credits
Put simply, corporate governance refers to the myriad ways in which companies are directed and controlled. This course will study corporate governance systems in the United States (primarily), but will also survey corporate governance structures abroad by way of comparison. We will study the legal and practical systems for the exercise of power and control in the conduct of the business of a corporation, including in particular the relationships among the shareholders, the board of directors and its committees, the executive officers, and other constituencies (including employees, communities, major customers and suppliers, and "society"). As one author has noted: "If the companies in which wealth is accumulated are poorly governed, if their resources are inefficiently used, if their managements are inept or if the power of their management becomes channeled in a way which conflicts with the company's interests, all stakeholders and society suffer, not just the 'owners' of the enterprise. It is therefore important that within every company there are means of ensuring that resources are used efficiently and in a manner that ensures the achievement of the company's objectives and its ability to contribute to the common good." The International Task Force on Corporate Governance of the International Capital Markets Group, International Corporate Governance: Who Holds the Reigns? 1 (1995). These questions are timeless ones, but they are also timely given the current rash of disclosures of corporate malfeasance at companies such as Enron, World-Com, and others. This course is recommended for those students pursuing an interest in business and/or commercial law, as well as those students interested in issues of corporate accountability more generally.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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CORPORATE LAW APPELLATE LITIGATION (BUSN-370) 3 credit
Enrollment: Limited to 24 students
Prerequisite: Business Entities
Grading: See detailed explanation below
Meeting Time: Thursdays at 11:30 a.m. (but see discussion below about flexible scheduling)
This is an experiential learning class that uses Delaware corporate law and the Delaware Supreme Court as its laboratory. Each student experiences the roles of appellate attorney, both in the preparation for and the carrying out of, mock oral arguments before the Delaware Supreme Court. Each student also experiences the role of Supreme Court jurist in preparing for and conducting oral arguments (as justices), and in preparing for and writing final opinions in these same cases. These simulations occur in connection with two recent or pending Delaware Supreme Court cases. Students study the actual briefs and appellate record, and are instructed to carry out their work as both advocates and justices with the same skill, diligence and ethics as is observed in the best practices of actual appellate litigators and jurists.

The course focuses on Delaware because it is the "home" for two-thirds of this nation's publicly-traded companies. As a result, Delaware's Supreme Court receives a steady stream of significant cases which are briefed and argued by America's most skilled appellate advocates. The Delaware Supreme Court jurists, and the judges on the Court of Chancery from which its appeals are taken, are universally recognized as the nation's most knowledgeable and skilled business law jurists. Consequently, the Delaware Supreme Court is to corporate law practitioners as the U.S. Supreme Court is to constitutional law specialists - not only the most prestigious practice venue, but also the best place to learn the "ins and outs" of both substantive corporate law and appellate litigation. This course should be of particular interest to any student interested in a commercial litigation, appellate litigation, or corporate law practice (whether transactional or litigation--oriented).

Oral Arguments, Opinions
Delaware Supreme Court Justice. Each student will be assigned to serve as a justice on two mock Supreme Court panels for each case that we study. In this role, each student will write two Supreme Court opinions. Each Court panel will hear oral arguments from two sets of advocates. In preparation for each sitting, student Justices will be responsible for reading all briefs submitted in the actual case, as well as the Chancery Court opinion, key cases or other legal authority cited in either the briefs or Chancery Court opinion, and other pertinent material included in the appendices.

Advocate. Each student will make one formal oral argument in each case representing either the petitioner or respondent. Each advocate will be responsible for mastering the actual briefs and all other pertinent material relating to the case.
Meetings and Arguments

The class is structured to simulate actual law practice and the actual work of Supreme Court jurists (and appellate jurists more generally). In order to adequately prepare for her or his role as mock oral advocate and mock jurist, each student must develop effective strategies for independently and collaboratively organizing and managing legal work. To assess and facilitate this learning, class generally meets in small groups during regular class time and at other times mutually convenient to the instructor and students rather than in a large class setting. Additionally, these meetings focus on developing each student's understanding of the nature of the litigation process from trial court decision to completed Supreme Court opinion, the role of the various actors in that process, and the requirements that ethics and best practices demand of these actors. Finally, these meetings are utilized for ongoing student self-assessment.

Evaluation and Grading
The final grade is based the instructor's assessment and evaluation of the student's professional skills in connection with: (1) work in preparation for mock oral arguments as advocate and as justice; (2) work in preparation for writing a final opinion in the role of Supreme Court justice; (3) conduct of oral argument as advocate; (4) conduct of oral argument as Supreme Court justice and (5) written work produced, including mock opinions.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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CORPORATE TAX (TAXL-306) 2 credits
This course examines the federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders, including incorporations, dividends, redemptions, and liquidations. Students interested in general practice, business transactional practice, or business litigation should take both this course and Partnership Tax to gain a comprehensive overview of the taxation of these two primary forms of business enterprise.

Prerequisite: Individual Income Tax (TAXL-300). Recommended but not required: Business Entities (BUSN-300).

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CRIMINAL MOTIONS PRACTICE (CRIM-340) 3 credits
This course will teach students advocacy skills at several non-trial stages of a criminal case. Students will perform exercises in some or all of the following: bail hearings, discovery, motions to suppress physical evidence and confessions, and impeachment of witnesses, among other topics and settings. Students will perform in various roles, e.g., defense counsel, prosecution, witness, judge, across the semester.

  • Section A (Portnoy) emphasizes written and oral advocacy;
  • Section E (Goldsmith) emphasizes oral advocacy and does not require written submissions.

Recommended: One or more of the following - Evidence (EVID-200), Criminal Procedure Adjudicative (CRIM-300), Criminal Procedure Investigative (CRIM-305).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE ADJUDICATIVE (CRIM-300) 3 credits
This course will examine issues of criminal procedure relating to trial as opposed to investigation. Topics addressed include the prosecutor's decision to charge; probable cause review prior to trial; probable cause hearings; grand jury review; the formal charging document, venue, and jurisdiction; the scope of prosecution including lesser included defenses and double jeopardy; speedy trial rights; discovery and disclosure of both prosecution and defense; the law of guilty pleas and law and practice covering the various phases of a criminal trial including voir dire; opening statement; presentation of evidence; motions to dismiss; and opening statement and closing arguments.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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CRIMINAL PROCEDURE INVESTIGATIVE (CRIM-305) 3 credits
This course will examine issues of criminal procedure that arise under the United States Constitution during the investigative phase of criminal cases: arrest, stop and frisk, search and seizure, interrogatories and confessions, informants, eavesdropping, and electronic surveillance.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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CYBERCRIME AND CYBERWAR (CRIM-382) 2 credits
This class will cover principles of criminal law and national security law as applied to computer crimes, with primary emphasis on the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. The class will begin with an overview of computer trespass laws and their application to computer hacking, and will also include a brief survey of search and seizure/electronic surveillance laws as applied to computers. Other topics covered include national security surveillance law and international law governing information warfare, including recent cases in cyber warfare.

No Prerequisites.

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CYBERSECURITY AND DATA BREACH: LEGAL AND PRACTICAL PREVENTION AND RESPONSE (INTP-387) 2 credits
This course explores common cyber-attack threats, including threats from criminal groups, state-sponsored entities, and malicious employees and contractors, as well as ransomware and other cyber-extortion schemes. The course covers the actions organizations should take to decrease the likelihood and impact of security incidents, such as identifying and providing additional protection for valuable data, conducting risk assessments, drafting effective Incident Response Plans, training employees, conducting incident response drills, and purchasing cybersecurity insurance. Students will learn how counsel can assist an organization's managers respond to a cybersecurity incident by engaging a forensic investigation firm under attorney-client privilege when appropriate, working with law enforcement, and guiding incident response team members' communications with executives, Board members, and the media. The course will address the 48-state data breach notification laws and federal, sector-specific notification regulations, including how to meet requirements to notify regulators and affected individuals. The course will train students how to respond to investigations by regulators and by the payment card networks when there is a theft of credit and debit card data. The course will study data security class action cases and appeals from regulatory decisions to determine how judicial decisions should affect how organizations respond to incidents. *Note: Randy Gainer, a partner practicing in the Seattle office of BakerHostetler, is currently teaching this course.

No prerequisites.

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CYBERSPACE LAW IN THE MODERN ERA AND BEYOND (INTP-330) 3 credits
In this course, students will explore the business and governing law of the Internet. Students will learn the foundations of computers, networks, and the Internet. The course then concentrates on surveying the primary Internet business plans, the intellectual property issues that consume those businesses (including patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks), first amendment and social media issues (including free speech, defamation and privacy) and other key Internet business and legal issues (such as online contracting, jurisdiction, tax and gambling).

No prerequisites.

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DIGITAL COMMERCE AND CONSUMER DATA (INTP-360) 3 credits
Digital commerce (also commonly known as e-commerce or e-business, with other more industry-specifically labels, such as e-tail), consists of the buying and selling of products or services over electronic systems such as the Internet and other computer networks. This course will explore the many legal and policy issues that affect businesses and consumers who partake in digital-commerce transactions. Topics covered include digital business models, formation and operation of digital-commerce companies, protecting the assets of digital -commerce companies, digital contracts, consumer protection and much more.

No prerequisites.

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DRAFTING LABS (DRFT-300) 1 credit
The drafting labs offer an introduction to drafting for law practice. They are also good courses for those students who want additional experience applying substantive law in a practical setting. During the first half of the semester, students enrolled in the course meet once a week as a large group to learn basic drafting skills. During the second half of the semester, students apply and refine those skills by working in labs, under the supervision of a practicing attorney. In the labs, students draft documents related to the subject matter of their lab: e.g., students enrolled in the Business Law Drafting Lab will meet with a business lawyer to draft documents relevant to business lawyering, etc.

Pre or co-requisite: The matching substantive course (e.g., Trusts and Estate for Trusts and Estates Drafting Lab). Restriction: This course must be taken pass/fail.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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