Courses Titled A - B

ACCOUNTING FOR LAWYERS (BUSN-367) 2 credits
This course explores fundamental concepts, processes, and vocabulary of accounting, auditing, and financial analysis. All lawyers, not just those with a business or tax practice, can benefit from the abilities to read financial statements with comprehension, to deal competently with accounting issues as they arise, and to communicate effectively on accounting-related subjects. This course is designed to help students develop these basic skills, with an emphasis on their application in matters of practical concern to lawyers. Neither a background in mathematics nor prior knowledge of accounting is necessary for this introductory-level course.

Pre or co-requisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300). Restriction: Students who have completed intermediate or advanced accounting courses are not eligible to enroll in this course.

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ADMINISTRATIVE LAW (ADMN-300) 3 credits
This is a survey course designed to introduce students to the powers and limitations of administrative agencies and the legal and political mechanisms which regulate them. Emphasis will be placed on coverage of a broad range of topics rather than upon detailed analysis of any particular area. The course's function in the curriculum is to serve as a building block for advanced courses in particular regulatory areas. Students will gain a basic familiarity with the structural and procedural arenas in which administrative agencies operate. Advanced courses can therefore begin with the assumption that students have this basic understanding and proceed quickly to more detailed coverage of the issues as they arise in that particular regulatory context.

No prerequisites.

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ADMINISTRATIVE LAW CLINIC (ADMN-400) 4 credits
Students represent clients before the Washington State Health Care Authority or Department of Social and Health Services challenging agency decisions to deny or terminate brutal needs public assistance benefits. All tools of administrative agency advocacy are explored and used, including representation of clients in adjudications, petitions for rulemaking, and in judicial reviews of agency decisions. Student teams must maintain office hours in the Clinic offices two days a week for a total of four hours a week on Mondays noon - 6 pm; Tuesdays 2 - 6 pm; Wednesdays 11 am to 4 pm; Thursdays 10 - noon, 2 - 6 pm. The days and times for office hours will be determined based on each student team's schedule. Students will be required to attend a clinic class one day per week.

Pre or Co-requisite: Administrative Law. Restriction: Students must meet the Law Clinic's conflict of interest rules.
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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ADMIRALTY (ADMR-300) 3 credits
In an age when information travels the globe instantaneously and people can travel to almost anywhere worldwide in less than a day, crossing the oceans in ships still takes about the same amount of time as it did 100 years ago. International transportation of everything from cars to computers occurs almost exclusively by water. It is only a matter of time before practitioners encounter Admiralty principles. This course is intended to provide a broad overview of the origins, development, and current status of admiralty law in the United States. The following topics will be discussed: sources of admiralty law; admiralty jurisdiction; maritime torts; maritime bodily injury; maritime contracts; maritime commercial instruments; maritime liens; marine insurance; maritime transportation; pollution; and miscellaneous maritime issues that do not otherwise fit into the above general categories. Guest practitioners will supplement typical class study. Grading will largely be based on a combination essay and objective question final exam.

No prerequisites.

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ADOPTION LAW AND PRACTICE (FAML-320) 2 credits
This course will focus on laws pertaining to the adoption of children and the current practice of adoption law. Topics covered will include the history and evolution of legal adoption in the United States, with particular attention to the constitutional jurisprudence surrounding the termination and relinquishment of parental rights; the evolution of "best interests of the child" as an area of major emphasis in adoptive placement; transracial and transcultural adoption, with particular attention to the Indian Child Welfare Act and Multiethnic Placement Act; international adoption and issues surrounding the Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption; and the status of state laws governing adoption by gay and lesbian prospective parents. The course will also examine Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) and state laws governing egg and sperm donation, surrogacy, and the establishment of parentage for children conceived through ART.

No prerequisites.

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ADVANCED ELDER LAW (ESTA-315) 2 credits
This course builds on the basic knowledge provided in Elder Law (ESTA-310), and will provide a rigorous introduction to the practical aspects of elder law. The Advanced Elder Law Seminar seeks to duplicate the experiences a lawyer is likely to face in a law office or section which serves mostly senior citizens. This course will utilize a problem-based learning model to simulate the challenges Elder Law attorneys face in formation of the attorney-client relationship, planning for incapacity and drafting documents such as Durable Powers of Attorney, Wills for seniors including Wills with Special Needs Trust provisions, drafting and funding Inter vivos Special Needs Trusts, establishment of a Guardianship and the Guardianship process, establishing Medicaid eligibility for a spouse and a single person, and handling adult protection issues.

Prerequisite: One of the following: Elder Law (ESTA-310); Trusts & Estates Clinic (ESTA-400); Indian Trusts & Estates Clinic (INDL-401); or permission of instructor.

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ADVANCED EVIDENCE (EVID-350) 2 credits
Advanced evidence takes your basic evidence coursework to the next level. This course bridges the gap between the theory of evidence principles and the practical application of those principles in Court. Students "learn by doing". Students will study the range of evidentiary issues that are raised in contemporary criminal and civil litigation, then argue those issues under the mentorship of a Superior Court Judge. Superior Court Judge Jack Nevin is twenty year veteran of both the SU faculty and the bench, as well as a highly experienced trial attorney with 20+ years of experience trying both civil and criminal cases. Students will be able to draw on this breadth of experience of practice and technique as they work through the curriculum and student exercises. Students will find this curriculum both supplements and prepares them for trial advocacy courses, externships, and the practice of law.

Pre or co-requisite: Evidence (EVID-200).

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ADVANCED LEGAL RESEARCH (LRES-350) 2 credits
This hands-on course prepares students for the practice of law in a technologically advanced environment. The course focuses on developing research skills and information discrimination techniques using electronic resources (Westlaw, Lexis/Nexis, Loislaw, various Internet legal websites). Print materials and electronic resources will be compared to explore their relative strengths and weaknesses. Students will analyze and develop cost-effective and interdisciplinary research strategies. This class will be taken pass/fail only. Enrollment capped at 30. While not a prerequisite, it is suggested that this class be taken after completion of Legal Writing II.

Restrictions: Course must be taken pass/fail. Students may not receive credit for more than one of the following courses: Advanced Legal Research (LRES-350); Legal Research Methods (LRES-300); and Online Advanced Legal Research (LRES-360). Recommended but not required: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200).

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ADVANCED REAL ESTATE: HIGH PERFORMANCE BUILDINGS (PROP-370) 3 credits
The development, leasing and selling of "green" or "high performance" buildings in recent years has opened up a host of legal issues for lawyers working for developers, municipalities, regulatory agencies, and others. This course will survey cases and legislation from across the nation and around the world and will examine the varied structures by which these disparate public and private entities work to allocate risk, establish incentives, and promote this cutting-edge form of development.

No prerequisites.

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ADVANCED TOPICS IN DELAWARE CORPORATE LAW AND LITIGATION (BUSN-382) 1 credits
This course examines Delaware corporate law, focusing on the inner workings of expedited and summary litigation, problems in the organization and functioning of a corporation, and mergers and other transfers of control. Students will receive hands-on experience in litigating corporate cases at the trial court level through participation in oral arguments as advocates and judges in the Delaware Court of Chancery. Grades in this course will be based on a short paper (2-3 pages) due the first day of class (25%), class participation (35%), and an in class examination that focuses on class lectures and the materials examined in connection with the litigation practice exercise (40%). Students will be sent all of the course materials ahead of time and are expected to have read those materials thoroughly before the first day of class. At the beginning of that first class, students will turn in their short paper, which should reflect generally on the course materials. The first three days of the course will consist of an in-class review and discussion of the course materials. Class participation will be judged in part by students' preparedness. The instructor will call on students randomly to answer questions about the course materials, and each student should expect to be called on at least once during the five-day course. Students will then be separated into groups and assigned to act as either plaintiffs' counsel, defendants' counsel, or the Court of Chancery itself. On the fourth day of the course, the students will assume their assigned role and either litigate or adjudicate based on the model case highlighted in the course materials. Finally, on the fifth day, the students and the instructor will debrief the litigation practice exercise, and the students will wrap up the course by completing a one-and-a-half hour, short answer exam.

Prerequisite: Business Entities (BUSN-300-A). Restriction: Course must be taken pass/fail.

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ADVANCED TORTS (TORT-305) 3 credits
This course will address torts and tort issues not generally covered in first year foundational torts, including business torts such as fraud, negligent misrepresentation, interference with contractual relations; first amendment governed torts such as violation of privacy, defamation, and appropriation of personality; and damages issues such as wrongful death, 'wrongful' life, punitive damages, and purely economic consequential damages. It will emphasize these issues from the point of view of the personal injury or insurance law practitioner rather than from an abstract doctrinal perspective; this course is recommended for those who are preparing for a career involving personal injury and/or insurance practice. There will be no significant overlap between this course and course offerings in products liability and insurance law.

Prerequisites: Torts (TORT-100/105).

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ADVANCED WRITING SEMINAR (WRIT-300) 2 credits
This course is designed for law students who see the legal profession as a profession of writers and who want to further develop their skills in effective persuasion and in the use of an elegant, clear style. Students will learn a comprehensive approach to style and editing, using Joseph Williams' Style, and they will apply that approach to a variety of legal writing tasks. They will also read selected material on argumentation -- taken from classical rhetoric, current argumentation theory, and narrative theory -- and apply that material to persuasion in legal writing. Coursework will include exercises, revisions of existing legal documents, revisions of your own legal writing, and a final writing project.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200).

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ADVERTISING LAW (INTP-350) 2 credits
This course examines the legal and regulatory frameworks and principles that impact advertising and marketing in today's global, wired world. The course provides an overview of traditional advertising principles, such as unfair competition and false advertising, and provides an overview of the effect that Intellectual Property and rights of publicity and personality have on advertising. The course provides an overview of the Federal Trade Commission Act and examines the duties and responsibilities of the Federal Trade Commission. The course further examines and considers new and emerging issues, such as online privacy and unsolicited commercial e-mail.

Recommended but not required: Intellectual Property (INTP-300).

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ANIMAL LAW (ANIM-300) 2 credits
This course will explore the substance and policies of legal issues relating to nonhuman animals. Topics will range from the historical evolution of such laws to the dynamic growth and changes in this field of practice over the last decade. Considerations include the legal status of animals as property; liability for injuries by/to animals; nature of damages for loss or harm to animals; veterinary malpractice; constitutional issues (Section 1983 civil rights litigation, standing, personhood, speech); federal protection laws; cruelty laws (and their varied applications to different species); administrative challenges to dangerous dog declarations; wildlife issues; legal questions involving conflicting human and animal interests; and more. Class lectures and discussions will often involve evolving legal issues and even currently pending cases.

No prerequisites.

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ANTITRUST LAW (ANTI-300) 3 credits)
The United States relies on competition rather than government regulation or private cartels to determine what goods are produced and how much is charged for them in most sectors of the economy. This preference for free market rivalry over centralized control is reflected in the federal (and state) antitrust laws: monopolization, mergers, horizontal restraints, and vertical restraints. The main goal of the course is to learn and apply contemporary antitrust analysis, which employs economics, precedent, and public policy in an effort to develop legal principles that advance consumer welfare.

No prerequisites.

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APPELLATE LITIGATION SEMINAR: LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW (2 credits) EMPL-375
In this class, students will explore cutting-edge issues in labor, employment, and employment discrimination law. Acting as attorneys and judges, students will participate in simulated appellate arguments addressing important legal issues currently pending in the federal courts. Thus, the course will allow students to hone appellate advocacy skills and develop substantive knowledge of current labor and employment law topics. Students will be evaluated on their participation in simulations as well as written judicial opinions to be turned in over the course of the semester; there will be no final exam.

Prerequisite: Legal Writing II (WRIT-200).
This course fulfills the professional skills requirement.

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ARTS LEGAL CLINIC (INTP-401) 1 credit
This course is a collaboration between the Law School and Washington Lawyers for the Arts, a non-profit organization. Students in the clinic will work with two experienced intellectual property attorneys who serve as adjunct faculty. On the second and fourth Mondays of each month, students will participate with the adjunct faculty in interviewing and advising artists and others seeking legal assistance regarding intellectual property issues. On the remaining Monday(s) of each month, the faculty will engage the students in a variety of lawyering skills activities, including discussions of interviews from the prior week, simulated skills exercises drawing on current developments in intellectual property law, and activities devoted to ethics and professionalism.

Prerequisites: At least one of the following: Business Entities (BUSN-300); Copyright Law (INTP-320); Intellectual Property (INTP-300); Trademark Law (INTP-315); or IP Licensing Law (INTP-310). Restrictions: This course must be taken pass/fail.

This course does not fulfill the professional skills requirement and is not included in clinic registration lotteries.

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AVIATION LAW (CIVL-310) 3 credits
This course provides students with a working understanding of the legal processes surrounding International and U.S. aviation law. The course reviews the sources of international aviation law including the International Civil Aviation Organization, and the Montreal Convention which governs international air carrier liability. U.S. aviation law is covered, including the Federal Aviation Regulations, the role of the FAA and NTSB, and tort liability analysis. Actual cases are analyzed by way of strategic problem solving, litigation strategy, and practice pointers. Aircraft transactions (acquisition, lease, finance and sales) are addressed by industry experts. Cutting edge legal issues involving drone operations and federal preemption are also covered. The educational experience is useful well beyond the spectrum of aviation law. This course is also a convenient mini-bar review for torts and product liability, civil procedure, evidence, and sales transactions. Prior aviation knowledge or education is not required.

No prerequisites.

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BANKRUPTCY (BANK-300) 3 credits
This is a survey course on the Bankruptcy Reform Act of 1978, as amended, the leading cases which have construed this statute, and associated state and federal laws governing debtor/creditor relations. Students will gain an overview of personal (or consumer) bankruptcy, as well as business bankruptcy reorganizations and liquidations. The course will emphasize practical problem-solving, considering the kinds of bankruptcy-related issues that arise in the course of a general law practice, not just those confronted in a specialized bankruptcy practice. Course topics will include the rights of debtors, the rights of creditors, the duties and the discharge of such duties by a Trustee, the rights and remedies of a Trustee, the procedural and substantive chronology of a Chapter 11 case, and the jurisdiction of the bankruptcy court.

No prerequisites.

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BAR EXAM STRATEGIES AND SKILLS (BSKL-300) 2 credits
The class focuses on building the analytical, writing, and organizational skills necessary to enhance students' ability to prepare for the Uniform Bar Exam (UBE). Students will become thoroughly familiar with the format and components of the bar exam, will review substantive areas of law covered on the UBE, and will enhance their critical thinking and analytical writing skills. This course provides students with intensive hands-on studying and writing practice, peer evaluation, and individual written feedback. Multistate Bar Exam practice test questions as well as Multistate Essay Examination questions are administered with strategy sessions to aid in the successful completion of both portions of the bar exam. Multistate Performance Test (MPT) strategies and writing techniques are reviewed along with the completion of one MPT. Memorization and outlining skills, time management strategies, and stress management techniques will also be taught.

No prerequisites. Restrictions: Students must be graduating within two semesters to enroll. 
This course is required for students in the bottom 33% of their 2L class (for full-time students) or 3L class (for part-time students).

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BIG DATA, INFORMED CONSENT AND THE FUTURE OF PRIVACY LAW (INTP-393) 3 credits
This course examines the technological trend of "big data," including an exploration of the promise of big data and of the threat that big data poses to modern privacy law. It includes an investigation of the fundamental building blocks of privacy law, the Fair Information Practices, with an emphasis on big data's implications for the concepts of notice and consent. Additional topics include identity and anonymization, the right to be forgotten, predictive policing, consumer scoring, online behavioral advertising, and big data and discrimination.

No prerequisites

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BIOETHICS AND THE LAW (HLTH-300) 2 credits
This course examines issues arising from advances in biological sciences and technology as they impact the legal rights and responsibilities of patients, health care providers, and government policy makers. Issues explored include the legal and ethical problems associated with experimental and investigational treatments, reproductive rights, treatment at the end of life, assisted suicide, genetic engineering, and health care resource allocation

No prerequisites.

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BUSINESS ENTITIES (BUSN-300) 4 credits
Spring 2017, Professor O'Kelley
(See below for the standard Business Entities Course Description)

Grading:
Option A: 50% final exam; 50% class participation and required daily writing (explained below)
Option B: 100% class preparation and required daily writing (explained below)

Materials:
O'Kelley and Thompson, Corporations and Other Business Associations (Aspen 7th ed. 2013)
O'Kelley and Thompson, Corporations and Other Business Associations, Selected Statutes, Rules and Forms (Aspen 2016)
Wall Street Journal (Student Subscription)

Attendance:
Required; maximum of three unexcused absences (explained below)

This course surveys the law of business entities. Particular emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the role law plays in the creation, evolution and governance of complex business organizations. Emphasis will be placed not only on understanding business entities as legal constructs, but also as social and economic institutions. Students will be expected to become experts in Delaware business entities law, and to understand the nature of the business lawyers as transaction cost engineer.

Class preparation, participation and daily development of competence is an essential component of this course. Each student will be required to prepare a written "ticket" prior to each class demonstrating his or her preparation for and engagement with the class materials, as well as his or her growing command of class materials. Admission to class is predicated on submission of a satisfactory written ticket at the outset of class. A satisfactory ticket will describe a student's understanding of the assigned material and its relationship to prior classes, will identify questions presented for discussion, and will demonstrate growing command of the course material. A satisfactory ticket must also include evidence of ongoing engagement with the Wall Street Journal as it relates to the course materials and discussion. Students are allowed 3 unexcused absences. Attending class without prior submission of a satisfactory ticket will be treated as an unexcused absence.

Students have two options for grading. Under Option A, the presumptive option, the final grade will be based 50% on the final exam and 50% on class participation and required daily writing (class tickets). However, during the first week of class, a student may instead elect to have their grade determined under Option B; a student so electing will not take a final exam and will be awarded a grade based solely on demonstrated competence as reflected in the student's class participation and required daily writing (class tickets).

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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BUSINESS ENTITIES (BUSN-300) 3 or 4 credits 
This course begins with a brief discussion of business risk. It then deals with agency principles and considers whether a business ought to be organized as a corporation, partnership, or other entity (such as LLC or LLP). The course next considers the formation process, capital structure, and limited liability before moving on to cover questions of internal governance. If time permits, we then consider questions particularly relevant to large, publicly held corporations such as social responsibility, corporate accountability, and takeovers. This course does not involve the application of the federal securities laws. The topics are analyzed under common law principles, the Washington Business Corporation Act, and the General Corporation Law of the State of Delaware.

No prerequisites.
This is a bar tested course.

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THE BUSINESS OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY (former title: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT) (INTP-392) 3 credits
This course focuses on the business of intellectual property. It does that by means of an in-depth study of the day-to-day intellectual property issues faced by innovation companies (i.e., technology, pharmaceutical, biomedical, media and entertainment companies) in creating and managing their portfolios of patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets. The course provides practical experience in thinking of intellectual property as business executives and in-house counsel do - as an asset or business problem (instead of a purely legal concept or issue). The course includes a survey of the main intellectual property disciplines (patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks). However, its primary emphasis is handling real-world intellectual property problems, such as: intellectual property licensing; setting up and maintaining "safe harbors" from copyright infringement liability for web-based enterprises; the establishment of a patent program; managing trade secrets; intellectual property due diligence for mergers, acquisitions and strategic alliances; managing open source software; and other commonly encountered intellectual property related business issues.

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Two or more of the following: Copyright Law (INTP-320); Intellectual Property (INTP-300); Patent Law (INTP-305); Trademark Law (INTP-315); or Intellectual Property: Law, Society and Technology (INTP-150).

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