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Seattle U students take third place in Indian law moot court competition

March 09, 2015

Jocelyn McCurtain and Drew PollomTeam Steel Eyes — also known as Seattle University School of Law students Jocelyn McCurtain and Drew Pollom — took third place at the National Native American Law Students Association Moot Court Competition this past weekend.

Held at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law in Tucson March 6-7, the competition drew more than 70 teams representing law schools from across the country.

McCurtain said the team nickname was something Pollom created both for fun and to evoke a sense of fearlessness. At the 2014 competition, this same dynamic Seattle U duo placed in the top eight teams.

For the competition, a two-person team briefs and argues a problem having to do with an issue in federal Indian law and/or tribal law and governance before a mock appellate panel. The panel generally consists of judges and lawyers who practice federal Indian law and Indian law scholars.

McCurtain and Pollom's coaches were Professors Eric Eberhard and Charlotte Garden. Both students are in their third year of law school and have competed in several regional and national mock and moot court competitions. McCurtain will work in the King County Prosecuting Attorney's Office after graduation, and Pollom hopes to work in Indian Country.

The team's participation was supported by the Center for Indian Law & Policy, where their 2015 trophy will be displayed.

The National Native American Law Students Association was founded in 1970 to promote the study of Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, and traditional forms of governance, and to support Native Americans in law school.

The group encourages native people to pursue legal education, but also strives to educate the legal community about native issues.