Academics

Fall 2016 Class Assignments

Class assignments are listed alphabetically by course name. All will be posted as received. If you do not see the assignments you are looking for, check TWEN, your professor's personal homepage or return to this web page to check again later.

1L Students:

You will also be able to find out information about your reading assignments for the first week of classes on the Canvas Fall 2016 New Student Orientation page at https://seattleu.instructure.com/login/ldap.   

You will receive your password for TWEN at the Orientation Program August 18 and 19. 

Courses

Administrative Law A (ADMN-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

Register for this course on TWEN.

As background for the introductory lecture, read pages 1-15 of the casebook.

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Admiralty E (ADMR-300-E)

Professor Shanahan

Please read chapter one of the text.

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Advanced Legal Research (LRES-350-A)

Professor Fitz-Gerald

This class uses Blackboard, available through LexisNexis for Law Schools. If you do not currently have a working Lexis Advance password, please contact Katie Smith katie.k.smith@lexisnexis.com to get one immediately. After you log on at lexisnexis.lawschool.com, look for the link on the left to Web Courses. Then click on Courses, locate the folder for Seattle University and locate the course title (Advanced Legal Research 2016). Click enroll and OK. You have readings as well as a short online assignment that must be submitted before the start of class on Monday.

Lexis just announced that they will be launching a new Lexis Nexis Law Schools home page over the weekend. The link to Web Courses will be moving to the top navigation of the new page.

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Antitrust Law A (ANTI-300-A)

Professor Kirkwood

Register for this class on WestLaw’s TWEN. As background for the first two classes, read pages 1 -35 of the casebook and Appendix B

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Business Entities A (BUSN-300-A)

Professor Dick

8/22 - Course Overview and Agency Introduction

  • Textbook: Read pages 1-8; 20-29.
  • Restatements: Read Restatement (Third) of Agency §1.01, §1.02 and §1.03; §§8.01-8.06.

8/24 - Agency Authority and Introduction to Partnerships

  • Textbook: Read pages 38-54.
  • Restatements: Read Restatement (Third) of Agency §§2.01-2.06, §3.01, and §3.03.
  • Statutes: Uniform Partnership Act (1997) (hereinafter “UPA”) §202, §301, and §306.

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Civil Procedure A (CIVL-100-A)

Professor Shapiro

Before the class: In the near future there will be a TWEN site for the class. You should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you should make it a habit to check there.

Class 1. For Tuesday, August 23
For the first class: First look over the introductory section of the casebook labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxv.) This is purely introductory. You should also review pages 17-24 of the Learning Civil Procedure (“LCP”) Comprehensive Study Guide (You will find the Comprehensive Study Guide on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column. You may wish to download a copy.)

The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:

A little guidance might be helpful: As you can see, Walker arises from the same events that lead Dr. King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.

I will post additional discussion questions for you to consider as you read these cases closer to the time we begin class. Look for a revised assignment sheet on the TWEN page in mid-August.

Class 2. For Thursday, August 25
First read 32-34 in the LCP Study Guide, then read 1-21 and 32-37 in the book. (Pages 32-37 may turn out to be for Class 3. I will determine this after Class 1. )

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Civil Procedure B (CIVL-100-B)

Professor Shapiro

Before the class: In the near future there will be a TWEN site for the class. You should sign up for it and then go there and check it out. You might want to check back from time to time as I will be posting documents there gradually. I use the TWEN site extensively during the semester so you should make it a habit to check there.

Class 1. For Wednesday, August 24
For the first class: First look over the introductory section of the casebook labeled “Study Guide.” (This begins on page xxxv.) This is purely introductory. You should also review pages 17-24 of the Learning Civil Procedure (“LCP”) Comprehensive Study Guide (You will find the Comprehensive Study Guide on TWEN. It has its own button in the left-hand column. You may wish to download a copy.)

The bulk of the class will be devoted to a discussion of the following readings:

A little guidance might be helpful: As you can see, Walker arises from the same events that lead Dr. King to write The Letter. These are, in a sense, different ways of looking at the same thing. We will use these readings to expose some of the central issues in law and in civil procedure.

I will post additional discussion questions for you to consider as you read these cases closer to the time we begin class. Look for a revised assignment sheet on the TWEN page in mid-August.

Class 2. For Friday, August 26
First read 32-34 in the LCP Study Guide, then read 1-21 and 32-37 in the book. (Pages 32-37 may turn out to be for Class 3. I will determine this after Class 1. )

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Civil Procedure (CIVL-100-C)

Professor Coleman

The material for this course consists of Stempel, Baicker-McKee, Coleman, Herr, & Kaufman, Learning Civil Procedure (2d. Edition West 2015).

For our first class meeting on Tuesday, August 23, please read Learning Civil Procedure pp. xxxv-xl; Comprehensive Study Guide pp. 1-3, 11-15, and 32-34 (posted on TWEN); and Walker v. City of Birmingham (posted on TWEN).

A TWEN site for this course has been established, and you should register for it using your Westlaw password. I have posted the syllabus for this class, and you should read it before attending the first day.

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Civil Procedure E (CIVL-100-E)

Professor Chon

Week One (August 24 and 25)
An Introduction to American Courts;
A Description of the Litigation Process;
The Evolution of Personal Jurisdiction

These first set of materials will give you an important overview of the US court system and the litigation process. Personal jurisdiction concerns itself with the court's power to bring persons and property into the forum, based upon the due process clause of the fourteenth amendment of the U.S. Constitution.

Transmittal letters dated 4/29/15 from Chief Justice Roberts to Representative John Boehner, Speaker of the House of Representatives and to Vice President Joseph Biden; Proposed amendment to FRCP 1 along with advisory committee notes

  • TWEN; also available by clicking on the following link: The entire package of materials transmitted to Congress is available here.
  • Read only pp. 13-16, 46 and 47. Skim anything else of interest to you.

GPR-H Chapters 1 and 2: 3-36

GPR-H Chapter 6: 145-61

Syllabus: We will discuss this in class on Thursday.

Please bring print copy of the one-page questionnaire to class on Thursday.

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Constitutional Law I B (CNLW-200-B)

Professor Siegel

Class #1: An Introduction to the Constitution and Constitutional Argument

  • DISCUSSION QUESTIONS AVAILABLE ON TWEN SITE
  • Casebook pp. xli-lvii (the Constitution)
  • Reader—pp. 4-12 (Bobbit)
  • Casebook pp. 11-34

Class #2: Judicial Review (and Judicial Supremacy)

  • DISCUSSION QUESTIONS AVAILABLE ON TWEN SITE
  • casebook pp.1-10 (Marbury and related materials)
  • reader pp. 244-265

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Constitutional Law II A (CNLW-300-A)

Professor Siegel

The Structure and Mechanics of Individual Rights Protection
Class #1: Introduction: The Evolution of Constitutional Rights and the Problem of Incorporation

  • pp. xli-lvii
  • pp. 517-548

Class #2: The State Action Doctrine

  • pp.548-570, 575-589, 593-600 (focus on Marsh, Jackson, Terry, Burton, and Moose Lodge)

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Contracts A (CONT-100-A)

Professor Mahmud

There is no reading assignment.

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Contracts B (CONT-100-B)

Professor Chinen

Your first assignment is also posted on TWEN. Please register for this course on WestLaw’s TWEN when you receive your WestLaw password. Purchase the Contracts §B Introduction to Contracts: The Law of Transactions Handbook and Workbook packet for this course. In the Workbook, do Unit 1 which will involve reading the materials stipulated in the Handbook.

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Contracts C (CONT-100-C)

Professor Chang

Read pages 5-17; 31-43 from Knapp, Crystal & Prince, Problems in Contract Law: Cases and Materials (7th ed. 2012). Pp. 5-17 are for background. Our discussion in class will focus on pp. 31-43.

Assignments and materials are also posted on TWEN.

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Corporate Tax A (TAXL-306-A)

Professor Kahng

Assignment for first class, Tuesday, August 23

Required texts

  • Schwarz & Lathrope, Fundamentals of Business Enterprise Taxation, 5th ed., Foundation Press (West), ISBN 978-1609300654
    • If you buy a used copy of this book, please make sure to purchase the 5th edition.
  • Stark & Bank, Selected Sections of Corporate and Partnership Income Tax Code and Regulations, 2015-2016 ed., Foundation Press (West), ISBN 978-16345939089
    • If you buy a used copy of this book, it is fine to buy an earlier version (e.g., the 2014-2015 or the 2013-2014 version).

Reading Assignment

  • Read pages 2-38 of the casebook along with statutory provisions and regulations specified therein.* Be prepared to discuss the problems on pages 33-34.
  • *Throughout the semester, as you read pages of the casebook, please also read the code sections and regulations specified therein. For example, page 10 of the casebook directs you to read §§ 761(a) and 7701(a)(3).

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Criminal Procedure Adjudicative

Professor Lobsenz

If you have not registered for this class on TWEN, please do so.

Aug. 22 #1
Casebook, Right to Counsel pp. 133-154 and Gagnon v. Scarpelli, 411 U.S. 778 (1973)

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Criminal Procedure Adjudicative H (CRIM-300-H)

Professor Roberts

Welcome all!
Please make sure you have the following casebook in time to do the first readings:

Criminal Procedure: Adjudication (Aspen Casebooks, 1st ed. 2011) - MAKE SURE YOU GET THE 1ST EDITION AND NOT THE 2ND EDITION. By Ronald Jay Allen, William J. Stuntz, Joseph L. Hoffmann, Debra Livingston, Andrew D. Leipold. ISBN: 978-0-7355-9025-0. As you know, this is a hybrid course, meaning that it involves a mix of in-person classes and online work. We will have 4 in-person meetings: August 22nd & 24th, and September 19th & 21st. All run from 4pm to 5:15pm in Room 309.

Our course will be housed on Canvas. I will be in touch before the start of class with instructions about accessing and starting to use that site. Please be sure to work through this orientation to Canvas and hybrid learning before our first class: https://seattleu.instructure.com/courses/1563070

Here are your first reading assignments:

For August 22nd:

  • Please read 961-66 (stop after n.1); 968-84.
  • Please keep a note of any questions or concerns inspired by this reading.
  • In addition, as you read each of our first three cases - Attica, Batchelder, and Armstrong - please be sure to isolate the legal rule(s) established, the rationales used to get there, and any reactions that you have.
  • For Armstrong, please also identify the legal question that the Court was asked to resolve. (We will use these early classes to drill case components such as legal questions/rationales/legal rules, so that we can develop a shared vocabulary before we disperse.)

For August 24th:

  • Please read pp. 989-1004.
  • Please come to class ready to discuss your thoughts on the following questions:
    • Scrutinize the Supreme Court’s justifications for grand jury secrecy at the bottom of 993, and make sure you understand them all. What sort of objections to this secrecy might there be?
    • What is the legal question that the court has to answer in In re Sealed Case?
    • What do you think are the strongest arguments that the OIC should lose in In re Sealed Case?

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Criminal Procedure Investigative E (CRIM-305-E)

Professor Sherman

First day assignment is to read pages 1-14 of the casebook.

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Criminal Law A/C (Crim-100-A/C)

Professor Russo

Wednesday, AUGUST 24, 2016
CLASS 1: THE CRIMINAL PROCESS, READING CASES and STATUTES, AND THE ROLE OF THE JURY

CRIMINAL LAW, Chapter 1; pg. 3-19

Questions for discussion:

1) Identify the elements in the following statutes:

  • RCW 9A.48.030: Arson in the second degree.
    A person is guilty of arson in the second degree if he or she knowingly and maliciously causes a fire or explosion which damages a building, or any structure or erection appurtenant to or joining any building….
  • Model Penal Code (MPC) Section 212.1: Kidnapping.
    A person is guilty of kidnapping if he unlawfully removes another from his place of residence or business, or a substantial distance from the vicinity where he is found, or if he unlawfully confines another for a substantial period in a place of isolation, with any of the following purposes:(a) to hold for ransom or reward, or as a shield or hostage; or(b) to facilitate commission of any felony or flight thereafter; or(c) to inflict bodily injury on or to terrorize the victim or another; or(d) to interfere with the performance of any governmental or political function.

2) “Problem Case”, pg. 15: Did the jury in the O.J. Simpson murder trial engage in jury nullification? Were they invited to do so by the defense? (For those who have never heard of O.J. Simpson or his infamous murder trial, here's a link to a quick summary from Prof. Douglas Linder of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, School of Law: http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/Simpson/Simpsonaccount.htm)

Friday, AUGUST 26, 2016
CLASS 2: PUNISHMENT

CRIMINAL LAW, Chapter 2; pg. 21-49

Questions for discussion:

1) Soon Ja Du/ Latasha Harlins trial: [Excerpted from the Los Angeles Times, July 17, 1992; Philip Hager, Times Legal Affairs Writer]:

  • "On March 16, 1991, 15 year-old Latasha Harlins was shot and killed by Soon Ja Du. Du, a 51 year-old Korean-born convenience store owner shot Harlins, an African American, in the back of the head after a scuffle involving a $1.79 bottle of orange juice. The incident at Du's Empire Liquor Market in South-Central Los Angeles was captured on videotape by a security camera, and the jarring scenes became the trial's most dramatic evidence.
  • Harlins, who witnesses said had stuck the orange juice bottle halfway into her backpack and had money in her hand, is seen in the videotape approaching the store counter. On the tape, Du grabs Harlins' sweater, and Harlins punches Du several times in the face. Then Du hurls a stool at the girl, who sets the juice on the counter and turns to walk away. Du then reaches for a pistol from behind the counter and shoots Harlins."

A jury convicted Du of voluntary manslaughter, a crime which (at that time) carried a maximum sentence of 16 years in prison. However, Judge Joyce Karlin, a former federal prosecutor, sentenced Du to five years of probation, and ordered her to perform 400 hours of community service and to pay a $500 fine. Although the law presumed a prison sentence for voluntary manslaughter, judges were permitted discretion in "unusual circumstances" in which the "interests of justice" were served, to impose only a probationary sentence. Thus, the judge suspended [in other words, did not impose] a sentence of 10 years in prison for Du, citing the following reasons:

  • a) Du had no criminal record
  • b) Du did not represent "a threat to society" in that she was "unlikely to reoffend"
  • c) Based on evidence that the gun used by Du had been altered [not by Du] to fire with only slight pressure on the trigger, the judge opined, "I have serious questions in my mind whether this crime would have been committed at all but for a defective gun"
  • d) The requirement of prison was aimed at armed criminals, not law-abiding shopkeepers, the judge said. Du had legally kept the gun for self-protection...and had fired under "great provocation, coercion and duress..."
  • e) "...no matter what sentence this court imposes Mrs. Du will be punished every day for the rest of her life."

Was Judge Karlin's sentence of Soon Ja Du justified? If so, under what theory or theories of punishment? If not, why did this sentence fail to serve any of the theories of punishment?

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CRIMINAL LAW B/C (CRIM-100-B/C)

Professor Ahrens

Please read pp. 1-29 of Dressler textbook. Please focus in particular on the text of the cases themselves and on the alternative possible jury instructions for “beyond a reasonable doubt.”

Please also draft a jury instruction that you would use, as a criminal defense attorney or prosecutor (your choice, if you think it matters) the concept of “beyond a reasonable doubt” to a jury. In doing so, you may use the language from one or more of the instructions in the book, or you may use your own language. Please do not do any outside research or worry about correctly formatting a jury instruction. I am looking for you to craft an explanation that you think makes sense based on the very limited amount of information you have from today’s reading and your own experience explaining things to people. Please come to class prepared to read your instruction out loud and to defend the choices that you made in drafting it (I will not collect the instructions, but will be calling on students).

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Elder Law A (ESTA-310-A)

Professor Freeman

If you have not registered on TWEN for this class, please do so.

Tue., 8/23
Thu., 8/25 Introduction to Elder Law, Kohn: 1 - 45

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Employment Discrimination (EMPL-315-A)

Professor Martin

During the first week, we will have an Introduction to the course material.

Monday:
Come ready to engage on what informs our understanding of discrimination in the context of the workplace.

Wednesday:
Introduction continues – Read the Peter Brooks Excerpt “Narrative Transactions” (7 pages) (Attached)

Additionally, I will post on TWEN a few short articles (2-10 pages each) that you should read by the end of the beginning of the second week of class. The articles will be posted under the “Reference Materials” link. The TWEN site will be available by the start of our first class.

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Environmental Law Fundamentals A (ENVL-300-A)

Professor Gonzalez

Required Texts:

  • Percival, Schroeder, Miller and Leape, Environmental Regulation: Law, Science and Policy 7th ed. 2013).
  • Percival and Schroeder, Environmental Law Statutory and Case Supplement 2016-2017 (2016).

First assignment:

  • Textbook pages 1-26
  • Excerpt from Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring (available on TWEN)
  • Excerpt from The Shock of the Anthropocene (available on TWEN)
  • Article published in the Anthropocene Review (available on TWEN)

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Evidence (EVID-200-A)

Professor Ahrens

Please read pp. 8-32 of your text. Please also read FRE 101, 102, 103, 104, 401, 402, and 403, as well as the advisory committee notes to those rules (they should be in your rule book, or you may look up the rule online and read the advisory committee notes there).

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Federal Indian Law A (INDL-300-A)

Professor Mirande

Please Register on TWEN for this class.

Text: Goldberg, Tsosie, Clinton, and Riley, American Indian Law: Native Nations and the Federal System (LexisNexis, 7th ed. 2015) (“Goldberg”).

Readings for 23 & 25 August 2016:

  • 23 Aug.: U.S. Const. Art. I, sec. 2, cl. 3; Art. I, sec. 8, cl. 3; Art. II, sec. 2, cl. 2; Art. VI, sec. 2; 14th Amend., sec. 2; 8 USC 1401(b); Goldberg 13-43, 45-50.
  • 25 Aug.: Goldberg 53-59, 62-77 (top), 763-764 (2d full P to top of 764).

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Foundations of Privacy Law E (INTP-321-E)

Professor Koeppen & Professor Nye

If you have not registered for this class on TWEN, please do so.

Tu 8/23
Read Chapter 1, pp. 10-41 of Information Privacy Law the 5th Edition

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Individual Income Taxation

Professor Kahng

Assignment for first class, Monday, August 22

Required books

  1. Graetz & Schenk, Federal Income Taxation, Principles and Policies (7thth ed. 2013), ISBN 978-1-60930-183-5
    • If you buy a used copy of this book, please make sure to purchase the 7th edition.
  2. Selected Federal Taxation Statutes & Regulations, 2017 ed., Lathrope editor, West, ISBN-13: 978-1634604345
    • If purchasing a used copy of this book, it is fine to buy an earlier version (e.g., 2015 or 2016) or the newest version (2017).

Course Syllabus

  • The syllabus is posted on TWEN under “Syllabus and Weekly Assignments”. The syllabus consists of separate units that contain problems, along with reading assignments from the casebook and specific provisions of the statute and regulations.
  • The specific assignment for each week will be posted as soon as practicable. Thus far, I have posted assignment for the first two weeks of class.

Reading Assignment

  • We’ll discuss Unit 1 during the first class. The specific reading assignment is as follows:
    • Read pages 1-12 and 27-39 of the casebook, and be prepared to discuss in class.
    • Skim pages 13-27, 49-81. This material provides an overview tax terminology and the tax system. We won’t specifically discuss it during our first class. I suggest you skim it now and re-read it more closely at the end of the semester.

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International Criminal Law A (CRIM-380-A)

Professor Slye

Assignment for Week of August 23
Sources and Authority of International Criminal Law

Reading Assignment

  • Tuesday, August 23
    • Chapter 1
      • Chapter 1 introduces some of the larger themes that we will be exploring in the course. They raise questions not only about international criminal law, but criminal law in general. Focus on the readings from Chapter 2. While we will briefly discuss the issues raised in Chapter 1, we will focus on the creation of the institutions that administer international criminal law.
    • Discussion questions:
      • What is the difference between restorative justice and retributive justice? Which do you prefer and why?
      • Are truth commissions and similar mechanisms legitimate approaches to mass atrocities, or are they mechanisms for providing lesser accountability for the wrongs of powerful people?
  • Thursday, August 25
    • Chapter 2 – up to Note 14 titled “Universal Jurisdiction in Spain”
      • We will discuss the application of international criminal law by domestic courts, focusing on universal jurisdiction.
    • Discussion questions:
      • When can a state assert jurisdiction over a crime?
      • How do we justify asserting jurisdiction over crimes that occur outside of the territory of a state? Are those justifications compelling?
      • What is the definition of universal jurisdiction? Do states have a right to assert universal jurisdiction as a matter of customary international law? A duty? What crimes are, or should be, subject to universal jurisdiction.

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Latinos and the Law A (JURS-360-A)

Professor Bender

Required Books: Everyday Law For Latinos/as & Greasers & Gringos

Tuesday August 23

  • Overview of Latina/o Stereotypes and Mistreatment of Latina/os in U.S. Law (A Class Apart video showing)
  • Greasers and Gringos read preface and pages 1-29
  • Hernandez v. Texas, 347 U.S. 475 (1954)

Tuesday August 30

  • Latina/os and Immigration Policy: Comprehensive or Compassionate Reform?
  • Greasers and Gringos, 114-134
  • Everyday Law for Latino/as, 205-209, 212-239 (skim)
  • Steven W. Bender, Compassionate Immigration Reform, 38 Fordham Urban Law Journal 107 (2010)

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Legal Writing I B1 (WRIT-100-B1), Legal Writing I B2 (WRIT-100-B2), Legal Writing I B3 (WRIT-100-B3), & Legal Writing I M (WRIT-100-M)

Professor Bannai, Professor Bowman, & Professor Dickson

Tuesday, August 23
(Introduction to Legal Writing and Introduction to Legal Reading), read Chapters 1 and 3 in The Legal Writing Handbook, Sixth Edition. Also read the “How to Read a Legal Opinion” article and the statute and case posted to Canvas.

Thursday, August 25
(Introduction to E-Memos), please read pp. 111-13, sections 15.1 – 15.1.5, and the sample e-memo on pp. 271-72 in The Legal Writing Handbook, Sixth Edition.

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Legal Writing I C2 (WRIT-100-C2) & Legal Writing I C3 (WRIT-100-C3)

Professor Cooper

  • Sign on to the Legal Writing I Canvas page
  • Read The Legal Writing Handbook, Sixth Edition Chapters 1, 2, and 11
  • Read the course Syllabus and Policies & Procedures documents posted on the Canvas Syllabus page
  • Take the Diagnostic Exam, which is a grammar, punctuation & writing usage diagnostic test. See details for how to take the Diagnostic Exam & upload a copy of your Pattern of Errors on the Assignments Page by Wednesday, August 31 at 11:00 PM.
  • Sign up for a tour of the Seattle University Law Library

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Legal Writing I E (WRIT-100-E)

Professor Samuel

Read chapters 1, 2 & 5 in Legal Writing Handbook and Memo 1 Assignment Sheet & Fact Pattern (posted on TWEN)

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Legal Writing II D (WRIT-200-D) & Legal Writing II E (WRIT-200-E)

Professor Krontz

Read chapter 19 in The Legal Writing Handbook, Sixth Edition

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Professional Responsibility A (PROF-200-A)

Professor Kass

Please Register for this class on WestLaw’s TWEN

Assignment #1: Lawyer Interview
In the near future you will be members of the bar. As lawyers you have unique rights and responsibilities that other members of society do not. In an effort to help you understand the various roles, rights and responsibilities of lawyers, and to help you develop your identity in the profession, the first assignment is to interview a lawyer with at least 2 years of practice experience and who is currently engaged in the practice of law.

Finding a Lawyer
I want you to get to know other professionals. Use this as an opportunity to learn about a practice setting or to meet an attorney you always wanted to get to know. Interested in a particular field? Here is an opportunity to try networking. I am not eligible to be the lawyer you interview, but you can look to:

  • Family members and friends who are lawyers or who can connect you with lawyers.
  • Bar associations and law schools can connect you with lawyers.

Approaching the lawyer
Let the lawyer know that you are a law student and have a class assignment that requires you to interview a lawyer. Let the lawyer know that the interview will only take 10-15 minutes and that you can do it by phone, in person or, if necessary, by email.

What to ask the lawyer
Please ask the questions below, but feel free to add any of your own:

  • Why did you become a lawyer?
  • What type of law do you practice, who are your clients, and how has your career path changed, if at all, since law school?
  • How often do you encounter ethical dilemmas?
  • If the lawyer has encountered an ethical dilemma, what was the dilemma and how was it resolved? If not, ask if the lawyer knows of colleagues who have encountered ethical dilemmas and how they handled the situation.
  • What are the biggest challenges related to being a lawyer?
  • What do you like most about being a lawyer?

Assignment requirements
This assignment asks you to reflect on what you learned from your interview and be ready to share a lawyer’s story in class. Focus on how the lawyer developed his or her identity in the profession and what you learned from the interview. You do not need to write-up your interview, but you do need to be prepared to discuss it in class.

Due date
Please complete this assignment before the first class meeting (August 22, 2016).

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Professional Responsibility (PROF-200-E)

Professor Johnson

If you have not registered on TWEN for this class, please do so. Please note that you must download the syllabus, not in HTML. The syllabus in TWEN has links to the below items. To see the links you must download the syllabus.

Class 1 (August 23, 2016)
Introduction to the Course and Expectations Regulation of Lawyers in Washington Ethics vs. Regulation

  • Read: Preamble History of the Washington State Bar Association
  • Listen: The Buried Bodies Case (45 minutes)
  • Skim: The State Bar Act

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Real Estate Transactions E (PROP-300E)

Professor Harris

Please register on TWEN.

Class 1, Tues., Aug. 23: Topic: Overview of a real estate transaction
Assignment: pp. 3-14; briefly skim through Supp. 275-278, Supp. 289-360

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Remedies E (REMD-300-E)

Professor Gordon

Class 1: Monday, August 22, 2016:
Introductory Lecture: "Justice in the Real World: God's Work on Earth Must Truly Be Our Own." Focus: The Rightful Position Principle. Casebook 1-18 (Includes Introduction plus U.S. v. Hatahley).

Class 2: Wednesday, August 24, 2016:
Value as the Measure of the Rightful Position. Casebook: 18-35 [Trinity Church; In Re September 11th – Twin Towers Litigation]

Problem No. 1 due Class 3.

I have created a website for this course at the TWEN site associated with Westlaw. Class members are authorized to register with the class access code which is as follows: RemediesSU2016

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Torts A (TORT-100-A)

Professor Powell

Text: Henderson, Pearson, and Kyser, The Torts Process (8th ed.)

When you receive your WestLaw Password during Orientation this week, register for Professor Powell’s course on TWEN.

Class 1: Henderson 1-9 (background), 9-19

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Torts B (TORT-100-B)

Professor Ainsworth

Text: Henderson, Pearson, and Kyser, The Torts Process (8th ed.)

{Overview of the legal profession and the legal process p. 1-9: you will find this helpful for all of your first year courses. Read this as background before our first class; you might want to review it later on this semester as you proceed in your classes.}

The elements of battery:

  • p. 9-19 (This is the reading assignment for the first class.)
  • p. 19-29 (This is the assignment for the second class, though we will likely begin that class by continuing our discussion of the p.9-19 section, and then proceed to begin this reading assignment.)

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Torts C (TORT-100-C)

Professor Mahmud

Read: Garratt v. Dailey, pp. 1-4 of the casebook.

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Torts E (TORT-100-E)

Professor Gonzalez

TEXT: Henderson, Pearson & Kysar, The Torts Process (8th ed.)
Please read pages 1-30. Brief the assigned cases in accordance with the briefing format for this course.

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Trademark Law E (INTP-315-E)

Professor Cumbow

Required Materials
Ginsburg, et al. Trademark and Unfair Competition Law - Fifth Edition
Supplement, posted on Course Site
Additional Materials listed in Syllabus and posted on/linked to from Course Site

Please make certain that you have the 5th Edition of the Casebook.

First Class Assignment
The class meets for the first time on Monday evening, August 22, in Room C5, from 7.30 to 9.20pm. Please come to class having read the following:

Text:
25-29: Borchard, “A Trademark Is Not a Patent or a Copyright ...”
59-62: Kellogg v. Nabisco
530-36: Dastar Corp. V. Twentieth Century Fox Film Corp.(and see correction to p. 535 in your Supplement at p. 124)

Additional*:
“Five Common Misconceptions Regarding Trademark Protection”

* “Additional” Readings are arranged by class date on the “Course Materials” page on the course Canvas site.

Note:
I recommend that students taking an intellectual property focus supplement this course by also taking the 1-hour Trademark Lab (INTP-316-E) taught by Professor Chad Smith.
The lab focuses on the basics of trademark practice, including trademark selection and clearance, filing and prosecuting trademark applications in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, ex parte and inter partes practice before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board, and maintaining and enforcing a domestic and international portfolio of trademark registrations.

If you have not registered on CANVAS for this class, please do so.

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UCC Secured Transactions

Professor Dick

8/22: Introduction; Remedies of Unsecured Creditors under State Law__

  • Textbook: Read pages 3-19.
  • Statutes: Read UCC §§1-101 through 1-103 (and Official Comments).

8/24: Security and Foreclosure

  • Textbook: Read pages 22-36.
  • Statutes: Familiarize yourself with the structure of UCC §1-201 through §1-206, UCC §9-101 and UCC §9-102 (and skim Official Comments). Please do not worry about mastering substance; read only to gain a sense of the layout of the UCC and where to find relevant definitions and rules of interpretation. Skim the Official Comments to gain a sense of the tone and depth of this explanatory material.

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